Programme

For the 2018 application form please Click Here.

ALL workshops and talks are held at The University of Reading, Whiteknights Campus, The Cedars, Building 55. Please see the Map and Location tab for directions and a map of the campus.

Doors open from 7.30pm for registration and refreshments. Talk starts promptly at 8pm. Free to members or £10 on admission for non RTG members.

 2017

10 October EMDR
Dr Michelle Zandvoort
14 November Sibling Relationships in Therapy
Lucy-Jean Lloyd
12 December Working with Complex Clients
Clare Andersen & Jane Stewart

 2018

9 January What Can Mentalisation Based Therapy look and feel like in Practice?
Serana Willmott
7 February When things get difficult - surviving attacks in psychotherapy and counselling
Toby Ingham
Saturday
24 February
Half Day Workshop
When Psychotherapy is Harmful
Phil Mollon
13 March Why don't Psychotherapists laugh
Ann Shearer
24 April  AGM 
(All members welcome)
8 May Death
Annie Cygler
Saturday
May
Half Day Workshop
TBC
Jenny Riddell
12 June Female Violence. A Psychotherapeutic Perspective
Anna Motz
9 October Somatic Countertransfernce in trauma work the therapist's body speaks of the client's unconscious
Morit Heitzler
13 November TBC
Cate Lyon
11 December TBC
Christine English

Free to members; £10 on the door for non-members.

RTG talks are approved for Royal College of Psychiatrists CPD: 1.5 external units per session. Sessions may also be used as proof of Continuous Professional Development (CPD) as part of re-accreditations. Certificates and records of attendance are available at each meeting.

Disclaimer: All details are subject to change without notice and RTG cannot be held responsible for any financial losses incurred as a result.

RTG respectfully ask that all mobile phones are turned off during meetings

NEXT MEETING

Blood Brothers and Ugly Sisters: An exploration of sibling dynamics in therapeutic work

Tuesday, 14th November 2017

Presented by Lucy-Jean Lloyd

Biography: Lucy-Jean Lloyd is a school counsellor working in a co-educational boarding school with staff and young people. She also works as a supervisor in university counselling services, as a tutor on the Diploma in Psychodynamic Practice at Oxford University, and runs a small private practice. These diverse contexts for clinical practice have all contributed to her interest in sibling relationships.

Synopsis: My talk will explore the question of where sibling dynamics fit in individual therapeutic work. I will examine relevant psychodynamic theory, and using some case material, look in more detail at the sibling dimension in our practice. After the talk, we will have time for questions and further reflection on this subject.

Blood Brothers and Ugly Sisters: An exploration of sibling dynamics in therapeutic work

Tuesday, 14th November 2017

Presented by Lucy-Jean Lloyd

Biography: Lucy-Jean Lloyd is a school counsellor working in a co-educational boarding school with staff and young people. She also works as a supervisor in university counselling services, as a tutor on the Diploma in Psychodynamic Practice at Oxford University, and runs a small private practice. These diverse contexts for clinical practice have all contributed to her interest in sibling relationships.

Synopsis: My talk will explore the question of where sibling dynamics fit in individual therapeutic work. I will examine relevant psychodynamic theory, and using some case material, look in more detail at the sibling dimension in our practice. After the talk, we will have time for questions and further reflection on this subject.

EMDR

Tuesday, 10th October 2017

Presented by Dr Michelle Zandvoort CPsychol, PsychD, MSc, BSc (Hons)HCPC Registered Counselling Psychologist

Biography: Michelle works part-time works as a Senior Counselling Psychologist for Berkshire NHS Foundation Trust at the Newbury Community Mental Health Team and part-time in private practice. She has 14 years experience of delivering individual and group psychological therapies within Inpatient, Forensic and Community Mental Health Services. She has designed and taught a Post Graduate Diploma in the Psychology and Treatment of Post Traumatic Stress and Complex Trauma for the Romanian Psychotherapy Institute. Currently she is an associate lecturer for Said Business School Oxford and HEC Paris on the Masters Programme for Coaching and Consulting for Change.

Synopsis: The presentation will provide an overview of EMDR, current research, its applications as well as a demonstration followed by Q & A. EMDR is a non-traditional psychological therapy developed by Psychologist Francine Shapiro in the 1980s to treat Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). EMDR has been demonstrated to change the way traumatic memories are stored in the brain resulting in a reduction in affective distress, physiological arousal and modification of negative beliefs. Since the 1980’s Its protocol and theoretical model has been refined and adapted for a range of different psychological difficulties. EMDR has been well-researched with more than 30 positive controlled outcome studies. It is internationally recognized as an effective treatment for the psychological consequences of trauma and other distressing experiences. In the UK EMDR is endorsed by the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE) as an evidence-based psychological therapy for PTSD.

Observations on Adolescent Behaviour Considered as "Weird" by some Adults

Tuesday, 13th June 2017

Presented by Nick Luxmoore

Biography: Nick Luxmoore is a trainer, school counsellor, teacher, youth worker and psychodrama psychotherapist (UKCP registered). He has over 35 years' experience of working with young people and with the professionals who support them. Nick's career has included teaching English and Drama in schools and prisons, teaching counselling at Oxford Brookes University, running a youth centre and youth theatre, setting up and managing a young people's counselling and information service, working as a school counsellor and as a counsellor with young refugees and asylum seekers. He is the author of ten books - Listening to Young People in School, Youth Work and Counselling (2000); Working with Anger and Young People (2006); Feeling like Crap: Young People and the Meaning of Self-Esteem (2008); Young People in Love and in Hate (2010); Young People and the Curse of Ordinariness (2011); Young People, Death and the Unfairness of Everything (2012); School Counsellors Working with Young People and Staff: A Whole-School Approach (2013); Essential Listening Skills for Busy School Staff: What to Say When You Don't Know What to Say (2014); and his latest work, Horny and Hormonal: Young People, Sex and the Anxieties of Sexuality (2016). His tenth book, ‘Practical Supervision for Counsellors Who Work With Young People’ will be forthcoming in 2017.

Behaviour Activation in Adolescents

Tuesday, 9th May 2017

Presented by Dr Laura Pass

Biography: Dr Laura Pass is a Research Clinical Psychologist working at the Charlie Waller Institute at the University of Reading. Her research is focused on understanding depression in young people and developing and adapting evidence based treatments that can be delivered flexibly in a range of settings.

Synopsis: Current treatment for depression in adolescents is sub-optimal and engagement is challenging. There is a need to develop low intensity treatments for depression that can be offered in a range of settings including schools. We have adapted Brief Behavioural Activation (BATD-R; Lejuez, et al., 2011) for use with adolescents (Pass & Reynolds, 2014). Brief BA is designed to be delivered by a range of professionals including those who do not have specialist qualifications or extensive training. In a pilot study of Brief BA with 20 young people with clinically significant symptoms of depression engagement was excellent. Brief BA was acceptable to young people and their parents. Most young people reported significant reductions in symptoms of depression and improved functioning. The therapists delivering Brief BA were from a variety of backgrounds and training. We are currently piloting the delivery of Brief BA for depression in schools as an alternative to referring young people for treatment in specialist mental health services. This talk will give an overview of key aspects of adolescent depression, how these are considered in Brief BA treatment, outcome data so far and plans for future work.

Annual General Meeting

The Cedars, Whiteknights Campus
Tuesday, 25th April 2017
7.30-9.30pm

Member Event: All members are expected to reply and let us know whether you will be attending or not so that we may manage administration, refreshments and the room.

AGENDA

  1. Apologies for Absence
  2. Minutes of the previous AGM
  3. Chairman's Report
  4. Treasurer's Report
  5. Vice-Chairman's Report
  6. Election/re-election of Committee Members
  7. 2016 Programme Review
  8. 2017 Programme
  9. 2018 Topics, Speakers and Subcommittee Meeting arrangements
  10. Any Other Business
  11. Date of next AGM

Spirituality in Therapy

Presented by Dr Alistair Ross
Tuesday, 14 March 2017

Biography: Alistair Ross initially trained as a Baptist Minister and worked in South London, Kent and Birmingham. He subsequently did an experiential therapeutic training at Claybury Psychiatric Hospital in Essex and worked as a pastoral counsellor and pastoral theologian. Further training as a psychodynamic counsellor and supervisor followed and since 2002 he has led the MA in Psychodynamic Counselling at the University of Birmingham. He is a BACP accredited counsellor and supervisor and is Chair of BACP’s Professional Ethics and Quality Standards Committee. Alistair is an accredited Baptist minister and on the editorial board of the journal Practical Theology and an international board member of the Society for the Exploration of Psychoanalytic Therapies and Theology (SEPTT). He is an associate member of the theology faculty in Oxford. Alistair’s research focuses on the relationships between the sacred, spirituality, religion, psychoanalysis and psychotherapy.

His latest book is Sigmund Freud: pocket GIANTS (The History Press , August 2016). Other recent books include Research Ethics for Counsellors, Nurses and Social Workers (with Dee Danchev, Sage 2014) and Counselling: A Practical Guide (Icon 2014). Lectures/articles/chapters include ‘Michael Eigen – Psychoanalytic Mystic’, ‘Letters from Vienna: Freud and his friend Pastor Pfister’, ‘Sacred Psychoanalysis’ – the emergence of spirituality in contemporary psychoanalysis; ‘Spiritual factors in therapy’; ‘Harry Guntrip: an early relational psychoanalyst’; and ‘Winnicott’s analysis of Guntrip revisited’.

Dr Alistair Ross – Department for Continuing Education, University of Oxford Director of studies in Psychodynamic Studies and Psychology; Course Director, Postgraduate Certificate in Psychodynamic Counselling; Course Director, Postgraduate Diploma in Psychodynamic Practice; Course Director, MSt in Psychodynamic Practice

Addiction: As slave to a master: the state of being addicted

Presented by Jill Fowler
Tuesday, 7 February 2017

Synopsis: Addiction has been described as a ‘state of being enslaved to a substance or practice that is psychologically and/or physically habit-forming’. This is surely a situation that no one would chose and would want to do everything they could to change; and yet, we know that the state of addiction is one that is extremely difficult to move out of and, indeed, addicts display the fiercest of resistance against interventions designed to help them! If we are to be of use to those clients who struggle with any form of addiction, it is essential that we understand something of the nature of the beast that drives the behaviour. This talk will consider some of the biological, neurological and psychological aspects of addiction that help to explain the tenacity with which people hold on to, and the lengths to which they will go in order to protect, their behaviour.

Biography: Jill Fowler is a very experienced psychodynamic counsellor and Jungian analytic psychotherapist with a long-standing interest in addiction and who brings both clinical expertise and academic research to her practice. She looks forward to a lively sharing of thoughts and ideas.

Transgender

Presented by Michelle Bridgman
Tuesday, 10 January 2017

Synopsis:The speaker aims to cover the following areas during the evening

  • Current Challenges–NHS–Treatment–DSM - Pathology-v-Identity
  • Brief History–Definitions & Terminology?
  • Surgery Female to Male and Male to Female - An Overview
  • Case study in small groups/triads & feedback
  • Countertransference & the Role of Supervision
  • The Role of Diagnosis
  • Gender Recognition Act–Legal aspects
  • Psychological & Clinical Treatment
  • Case study in Small Groups & Feedback
  • Optional Live Supervision
  • Unanswered Questions & Feedback

Biography: Michelle Bridgman MSc Psychotherapist & Gender Identity Consultant Shelley works with children who are Transgender or are struggling with their gender identity and is a regular commentator in the media on Gender Identity Issues with children. As a Keynote Speaker she speaks on the Art of Positive Change and on working with children with Gender Dysphoria. She is a member of The Professional Speakers Association (PSA), United Kingdom Association of Counselling and Psychotherapy (UKCP), British Association of Counselling & Psychotherapy (BACP) and World Professional Association of Transgendered Health (WPATH) Shelley has an extensive media presence and publishing history including: Psychotherapy expert on BBC Breakfast News, BBC World News, SKY News, LK Today, Channel 4, Channel 5 and on various Radio Stations. Publications featured in Psychologies & Therapy Today. In addition to writing all the above TV shows, her first book “Stand-Up for Your Self” was published in January 2014. Writing magazine shortlisted it for best self-published book of 2001. For more detailed information about Michelle and her work you can access her website: www.michellebridgman.com

Life Transitions and Coming of Age: A Transpersonal Perspective.

Presented by Paul Margrie
Tuesday, 13 December 2016

Synopsis: This interactive presentation will explore the life journey from the perspective of spiritual and psychological transitions. The journey followed is as follows.

  • Initial separation from Spirit. (The origin of that “longing for home” feeling)
  • The journey of incarnation through the Planes of Consciousness.
  • Manifesting in a body. The 1st encounter with the physical realm.
  • The inter uterine experience.
  • Birth.
  • Ego formation.
  • Adolescence and puberty.
  • 28 and the Saturn Return.
  • Career and adult identity.
  • Life crisis/mid- life crisis.
  • Reconnection to Spirit.
  • Coming of age.
  • Death and return to Spirit.

My intention is to provide a map that helps to orientate us in the territory of the psyche through the ongoing life stages. The evening will consist of teaching and some personal sharing by participants.

Biography: Paul Margrie: I have been working as a psychotherapist for over 20 years. My engagement with this work began when I was living in Eire where I owned an organic smallholding and ran a landscape gardening business. I got involved in Co Counselling and found that I truly loved working with people. For about 4 years I ran men's groups in Eire and was becoming more and more involved in therapeutic work. In 1992 I decided it was time to get serious and train properly to be a psychotherapist. I returned to the U.K. after nearly 20 years away and spent the next 5 years training at CCPE (The Centre for Counselling and Psychotherapy Education). I qualified in 1997 and have since completed a supervisor training programme and an Advanced Diploma in Transpersonal Psychotherapy. Currently I run a busy private practice; supervise individuals and groups; teach and facilitate at CCPE; and am a member of the Management Committee at CCPE. I was until recently the CCPE representative to the UKCP and the BACP.

Their dark materials: working with violence, fear and trauma

Presented by Gewn Adshead
Tuesday, 11th October 2016

Synopsis: This workshop focuses on work with clients who have experienced extremes of fear and violence; and who may also have perpetrated fear and violence on others. Their thoughts and feelings may appear unacceptable and unthinkable to others, and to themselves. How should therapists think about engaging and working with such clients? In this workshop, we will discuss assessment and engagement in treatment; the evidence base for the treatment of severe disturbance; then discuss some common blocks to therapy and challenges for the therapist. We will also discuss risk: how think psychologically about it, and how to deal with the effects of fear on the therapist. We will conclude with discussion of the ethics of this work.

Biography: Dr Gwen Adshead is Consultant Forensic psychiatrist and psychotherapist. She has worked as a therapist in secure settings for over 15 years, most recently at Broadmoor Hospital. Gwen is a group therapist and trained in mindfulness based cognitive therapy. She has run therapeutic groups for men and women with severe personality disorders who have committed offences against other people. She has also worked in two trauma clinics with refugees and survivors of acts of violence. Gwen holds a master's degree in medical law and ethics from Kings University London; and has a long standing interest in psychiatric ethics; especially in relation to psychotherapy and forensic psychiatry. She has published over 100 books, book chapters and papers; and is currently working on a textbook of psychotherapy for Oxford University Press.

Working with People with Chronic Illnesses or Disabilities
Half Day Workshop

Led by Julia Segal
Presented by RTG in celebration of our 30th Anniversary

Saturday, 25th June 2016

Synopsis: Aim of the workshop is to share experiences of working with people facing illness or disabilities. At the end of the session participants will have considered some of their own assumptions, attitudes and beliefs about some illnesses and disabilities as well as have an appreciation of the sources of their own and others' ideas about illness and disability, and the effect of these sources on their own thinking. We shall discuss wide variability in attitudes, beliefs and assumptions about illness and disability, and the difficulty in knowing how any other person will feel about their own situation. We shall explore the influence of time and the grieving process on feelings about illness and disability. We shall also consider some of the conflicts which arise for client and counsellor when either has an illness or disability.

Biography: Julia Segal, is a Fellow of the BACP. She works as a counsellor for people affected by neurological and other physical health conditions in North West London. She has counselled more than 400 people with Multiple Sclerosis and more than 200 members of their families over the past 20 years and many people with other neurological conditions, and those connected to them. Julia trains professionals who work with people with neurological or other disabling conditions. She writes about illness, disability and counselling. Julia has a particular interest in the ideas of Melanie Klein and Hanna Segal, and their application to everyday life.

PREVENT- Safeguarding Children from Extremism

Presented by Kalsoom Bashir
Tuesday, 14th June 2016

Synopsis: Prevent is about stopping people being drawn into extremism and becoming terrorists. The workshop builds our understanding of how young people can become radicalised and be vulnerable to extreme views and actions which could lead to acts of violent extremism. Practitioners working with young people may well become aware of changes and signs that might indicate the early stages of vulnerability to extremism. This workshop will enable practitioners from all agencies to recognise signs, and to know what action to take in response to concerns. Extremism in itself is not illegal but practitioners need to be aware of potential signs that may be part of a pathway to terrorism. Event Outcomes:

  • Gain an understanding of the Prevent agenda and be able to identify your role within it
  • Recognise signs that a Young Person may be vulnerable to radicalisation
  • Receive a clear picture of the risks and threats both nationally and at a local level
  • Develop knowledge and confidence to discuss grievances
  • Gain a raised awareness of the key issues and how these can be tackled by all agencies
  • Increase your agency's capacity to prevent violent extremism

Biography: Kalsoom Bashir has worked extensively for the past 25 years with Muslim communities. Having graduated at London University with a Bachelor in Education, Kalsoom went on to teach for 18 years; completed a certificate in Muslim chaplaincy from the Markfield Institute and is a chaplain at Bristol University. Kalsoom completed a higher certificate in counselling at Bristol University. Kalsoom has been regularly involved with interfaith initiatives and was a member of the founding board of Radio Salaam Shalom, a ground-breaking project creating space for dialogue between Muslims and Jews. She has presented radio programmes on local community radio stations and has been a regular contributor to Thought for the Day on Radio Bristol. Kalsoom has been the lead Prevent Office for Bristol City Council and has had responsibility for identifying areas of PVE consultation with Muslim communities in Bristol, delivering projects that build the capabilities of Muslim communities, including young people and women and to provide positive leadership and confidence to local communities in challenging extremism. In addition to this role with Bristol City Council, Kalsoom was also selected to serve on the National Muslim Women's Advisory group which advised the Department for Communities and Local Government on issues around empowering Muslim women and increasing their participation in the civic, economic and social life of the nation. Currently, Kalsoom has been seconded to Avon and Somerset police as regional trainer. www.wewillinspire.com

Cognitive treatment and understanding of preadolescent social anxiety disorder

Presented by Dr Brynjar Halldorsson
Tuesday, 10th May 2016

Synopsis: Social anxiety disorder is one of the most common mental health problems. Although the onset of the disorder is typically located in adolescence, there is evidence that the disorder commonly emerges in childhood, even in children as young as four. However, we know very little about the problem in pre-adolescent children. If left untreated, social anxiety typically runs a chronic course and causes significant interference in peoples' lives. Treatments that have specifically been developed for childhood social anxiety emphasize social skills training on the assumption that children with social anxiety disorder have social skills deficits. In contrast, the most effective treatments for adult social anxiety disorder are grounded on cognitive models that consist of a discrete number of clearly defined and carefully tested maintenance mechanisms that are then specifically targeted in treatment. Whilst etiological models have been developed, no such models for childhood social anxiety disorder exist. It is not clear if, or to what extent, the same cognitive and behavioural processes that occur in adult social anxiety disorder apply pre-adolescent children who are suffering from the same anxiety problem. Furthermore, there are likely to be factors specific to childhood social anxiety, which are typically not considered relevant in the treatment for adult social anxiety disorder.

This workshop led by Dr. Brynjar Halldorsson will focus on exploring social anxiety in pre-adolescent children. The aim is to examine how cognitive models explain the problem as well as presenting a new model that is specific to childhood social anxiety – a model that may better help us to treat and understand this complex anxiety disorder.

Biography: Dr. Brynjar Halldorsson is a Clinical Postdoctoral Research Fellow and a Clinical Psychologist at the Anxiety and Depression in Young People Research Unit, University of Reading. Currently, his research work focuses on increasing our understanding of social anxiety disorder in pre-adolescent children with the intention of developing new treatment interventions for this anxiety problem. Brynjar is also accredited by the BABCP as a Cognitive Behavioural Therapist. His clinical work within the NHS has focused on treating anxiety problems in children and adults, focusing particularly on treating social anxiety and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Brynjar completed his PhD from the University of Bath and was supervised by Professor Paul Salkovskis. His PhD focused on developing new treatment interventions and theoretical understanding of compulsive behaviours.

Annual General Meeting

The Cedars, Whiteknights Campus
Tuesday, 26th April 2016
7.30-9.30pm

Member Event: 2016 is a special year as we will be celebrating our 30th year as a Group. We would very much like the members to be present to put together some ideas about how to celebrate this great achievement. All members are expected to reply and let us know whether you will be attending or not so that we may manage administration, refreshments and the room.

AGENDA

  1. Apologies for Absence
  2. Minutes of the previous AGM
  3. Chairman's Report
  4. Treasurer's Report
  5. Vice-Chairman's Report
  6. Election/re-election of Committee Members
  7. 2015 Programme Review
  8. 2016 Programme
  9. 2017 Topics, Speakers and Subcommittee Meeting arrangements
  10. Any Other Business
  11. Date of next AGM

Comorbid Disorders and Cross Addictions

Presented by Thaddeus Birchard
Tuesday, 8th March 2016

Synopsis: This workshop will explore comorbid disorders which either accompany compulsive behaviours or give rise to compulsive behaviours. We will look at depression, anxiety, and OCD. While loneliness and low self-worth are not 'disorders' these are often problematic and unpleasant feeling states that can drive sexual compulsivity. As individuals rarely present with only one addiction, we will further consider how addictions interrelate to one another and, in particular, how sexual compulsivity interrelates to other addictive mechanisms. The workshop will include direct presentation of material and some experiential work.

Biography: Dr Thaddeus Birchard trained at the Whittington Hospital and has a Diploma in Cognitive Behavioural Therapy from London Metropolitan University and an MSc in Psychosexual Therapy from the School of Health and Social Care, London South Bank University. He also has a Doctorate in Psychotherapy from Middlesex University and the Metanoia Institute. He is accredited for practice with the British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies, College of Sexual and Relationship Therapists and is registered with the United Kingdom Council for Psychotherapy. He is the Founder of the Association for the Treatment of Sexual Addiction and Compulsivity. His doctoral research was on the psychotherapeutic treatment of hypersexual disorders. Author: CBT for Compulsive Sexual Behaviour – A Guide for Professionals [Routledge May 2105]

Law, Ethics and Record Keeping

Presented by Peter Jenkins
Saturday, 27th February 2016

Synopsis: The aims of the workshop are:

  • to explore legal and ethical aspects of therapy
  • to identify legal issues of current concern to therapists
  • to relate practitioner concerns to the BACP Ethical Framework (2013)
  • to provide basic information on law and therapeutic practice

Biography: Peter Jenkins is a Senior Lecturer in Counselling and an honorary counsellor at Manchester University. He has been a member of the BACP Professional Conduct Committee, and of the UKCP Ethics Committee. He has published widely on legal aspects of therapy, including:

Therapy with Children. (2010) Sage, Second edition (co-author with Debbie Daniels)
Exploring Children's Rights. (2013) (Training pack) Pavilion, Second edition
Counselling Psychotherapy and the Law. (2007) Sage, Second edition.

Please click here to access details and the application form.

Female Genital Mutilation (FGM)

Presented by Fatuma Farah
Tuesday, 9th February 2016

Synopsis: Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) has been brought over by the practicing communities since they have been immigrating or seeking asylum in the UK. Fatuma Farah will speak to Reading Therapies Group about FGM. She is from an FGM practicing community and trained as a psychotherapist. During her talk Fatuma will cover the facts and figures about FGM and also the following points.
• Legal and cultural perspectives. • How FGM fits/differs from other forms of sexual abuse. • How a therapist begins to think about this in client work. • Which ethnic groups are affected and how to discuss this subject appropriately with a victim or perpetrator. • What are the laws/ legal position? Who can help support a therapist or patient? Are there specific people to engage within this process? • Which cultures are affected, what age? • Does FGM present as the primary issue in therapy or does it follow other presentations? • What are the issues these women face and how can we as therapists prepare to be cathartically receptive? • What would a therapist like to know in order to help client with these issues?

Biography: Fatuma Farah is a psychotherapist who is at the end of her training as a clinical supervisor. Fatuma works for Kids Company as a clinical lead and is also the FGM consultant for the organisation. Fatuma has worked for the United Nations in her native country Somalia, where she was attached to the Ministry of Health. She has seen the impact of FGM in practicing communities. Fatuma delivers FGM training to British professionals and practicing communities.

Information Pack on FGM (UK Govt)

FGM On-Line Training (CPD)

Home Office Mandatory Reporting

Therapy across culture and languages

Presented by Dr Beverley Costa
Tuesday, 12th January 2016

Synopsis: This session will refer to theory and to clinical experience from Mothertongue in order to explore ways of working with people whose world views, life experiences and values may differ significantly from those we personally hold. It will include models of acculturation, communication and coping skills employed across cultures, generations and class. Time permitting,we will also consider the issues which impact on therapy when working with an interpreter as well as research on second language acquisition. This research demonstrates that people are able to access emotions in a second language that have been repressed in their native culture and language and that by switching to a second or other language the client can regulate emotional distance or proximity. Implications for effective practice will be shared and considered together. Mothertongue multi-ethnic counselling service www.mothertongue.org.uk was founded in 2000 to offer culturally and linguistically sensitive counselling and therapy to people from the black and minority communities in and around Reading.

Biography: After training as a group and individual psychotherapist and psychodramatist, Beverley Costa set up Mothertongue, a culturally and linguistically sensitive therapeutic support service for people from black and minority ethnic communities, in 2000. Mothertongue also runs a dedicated Mental Health Interpreting Service. In 2008 Mothertongue won the Award for Excellence in the Practice of Counselling and Psychotherapy from the British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy and in 2009, The Queen's Award for Volunteering. Her paper, Psychotherapy Across Languages, in collaboration with Professor Jean-Marc Dewaele, won the BACP Diversity and Equality Research Award for 2013. Mothertongue is currently working in partnership with the Victoria Climbie Foundation to raise awareness of the issues of multilingual children in care and their families and she has published a White Paper on this topic. Beverley has published a number of other papers and chapters about language, culture and therapy. Her doctorate documented the genesis and development of Mothertongue multi-ethnic counselling service. She holds an Honorary Research Fellowship with Birkbeck, University of London and her current research projects focus on the experiences of: multilingual clients in therapy; clients using Mental Health Interpreting services, children who interpret for their family members and people in cross-language relationships.
In 2013 Beverley founded Colleagues Across Borders, a volunteer project of professional psychotherapists in the UK who offer support and training to trained refugees and asylum seekers offering psychosocial support with refugee organisations in North Africa.

An Introduction to Energy Psychology

Presented by Sabrina Piergrossi
Tuesday, 8th December 2015

Synopsis: Energy Psychology is an umbrella-term comprising therapies such as Emotional Freedom Techniques (EFT) ,Thought Field Therapy (TFT), Advanced Integrative Therapy (AIT) and many more. It is an exciting and emerging field, with a growing evidence-base, and much promise for how it can enhance our current ways of working as psychologists, counsellors and psychotherapists. It generally involves somatic activation, with the client stimulating acupressure points, or energy centres such as the chakras, whilst thinking or talking about the issues causing distress. It can gently alleviate emotional and somatic distress, and some of the hypothesised mechanisms of action, based on imaging studies, involve a deactivation of the limbic brain. From an original focus on simple phobias, the application of Energy Psychology methods has greatly expanded to include trauma and most forms of psychological distress and dysfunctional personality patterns. The effective use in areas of natural disasters has been particularly noteworthy, with Energy Psychology methods proving not only effective but rapid and gentle. In this talk, I will introduce this field, giving a brief demonstration and illustrating how we might start integrating some of these techniques into our current practice. I invite people to attend with an open, 'curious' mind, as we approach a new paradigm for healing. Recommended reading prior to the talk: Acupoint Stimulation Research Review

Biography: Dr Sabrina Piergrossi is a Counselling Psychologist (HCPC registered, and BPS member) with more than 9 years' experience working with adults with severe and enduring mental health issues in the NHS. Additionally, she has a small private practice and enjoys being a Visiting Lecturer with the University of Surrey and supervising Trainee Counselling Psychologists on placement. Over the years, she has developed a particular passion working with Complex Trauma presentations using mind-body approaches, due to having experienced these approaches to be more effective, and less likely to be re-traumatising, than talking therapy alone. Within this field, she has extensive experience working with Mindfulness-based approaches, both individually and in groups, she has trained in EMDR (Level 1), and attended workshops in Sensorimotor Psychotherapy. However, her true calling led her to train in a range of Energy Psychology approaches, due to the speed and depth of healing these have provided both herself and her clients. She has trained with renowned Clinical Psychologist and Psychoanalyst Phil Mollon in Psychoanalytic Energy Psychotherapy (PEP - an integration of a number of Energy Psychology approaches), and with Howard Brockman in Dynamic Energetic Healing (Advanced Level), as well as attended various Energy Psychology based CPD workshops. She delivers training to Psychologists and other colleagues on Energy Psychology and its applications.

Adoption

Presented by Maggie Rogers
Tuesday, 10th November 2015

Synopsis: One in four people in the UK is affected by adoption. During the workshop, Maggie will discuss her work, in the therapeutic space, with clients affected by adoption: adopted people; birth parents; children of adoption and their families. She will highlight theoretical underpinnings: attachment theory; trauma and neuroscience. This is an interesting time to be providing adoption therapeutic support - the government has provided an adoption support fund of £19.3 million to support therapeutic interventions for children of adoption - a recognition of the importance of the ongoing consequences of early trauma in the lives of many adopted children and the impact this may have on them and their adoptive families. Maggie will remind those attending about the requirement to be Ofsted registered if working with adopted clients. Maggie hopes to involve participants in small group discussions throughout the workshop.

Biography: Maggie Rogers is an Ofsted Registered Adoption Support Therapist - she has a private practice, is an Associate of ASART (Adoption Support Agency of Registered Therapists) and is a Senior Manager at PAC-UK (Post Adoption Centre). Maggie is a UKCP Psychoanalytic Psychotherapist and ex Chair of IPSS (Institute of Psychotherapy and Social Studies).

Staying on the Surface: the difficult art of Solution Focused conversation

Presented by Evan George
Tuesday, 13th October 2015

Synopsis: Having proved its worth to front-line practitioners in the fields of mental health, substance misuse, youth offending and intensive interventions with 'troubled' families, the solution focused approach is proving of increasing interest in the worlds of counselling, psychotherapy and coaching where it is valued for its radical client-centredness as well as for its potential for brevity. Deceptively simple the approach remains surprisingly challenging at the levels both of conceptualisation and practice. This workshop led by Evan George will offer participants an introduction to the thinking and to the core techniques at the heart of the model through a mix of presentation, recorded example, exercise and discussion.

Biography: Evan George is a founding partner in BRIEF, Europe's largest provider of Solution Focused training. BRIEF is now regarded by many as one of the most influential teams currently in practice in the Solution Focused approach. Evan has presented his work throughout the UK, Europe and further afield. Evan is an accredited Systemic Psychotherapist and co-author of three books on the solution focused approach, Solution Focused Brief Therapy: 100 Key Points and Techniques (Routledge: 2012), Problem to Solution (BTPress: 1999), and Brief Coaching: A solution focused approach (Routledge: 2012). Evan's interests range beyond his work with individuals, whether children, adolescents or adults, couples and families. He works with teams and organisations and is currently writing on Building Cooperation with reluctant clients.

Mindfulness

Presented by Michèle Relmy
Tuesday, 9th June 2015

Synopsis: Mindfulness-Based programs prioritize learning how to pay attention or concentrate with purpose, in each moment and most importantly, without judgment. Through mindfulness, patients can recognize that holding onto some of these feelings is ineffective and mentally destructive. Relaxation and happiness are not the aims of Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT), but rather a "freedom from the tendency to get drawn into automatic reactions to thoughts, feelings, and events". The aim is to enhance awareness so patients are able to respond to things instead of react to them. Therapists practicing Mindfulness recognize its influence on their therapeutic practice, from an increased comfort with silence, an ability to focus more on their clients and the therapeutic process to a changed view of therapy and the healing process. Participants may wish to use and integrate mindfulness practices into their therapy sessions with some clients and this will be discussed. This talk will involve brief education about Mindfulness, short structured mindfulness meditation exercises & discussions on Mindfulness as a therapeutic tool with clients.

Biography: Michèle Relmy is an Integrative Psychotherapist (UKCP), originally trained as a Psychodynamic Counsellor. She has been working for two decades in private practice, seeing individuals and couples. She also work on the general program of a psychiatric hospital with groups and individuals suffering from depressing and anxieties. She trained as a Mindfulness Teacher seven years ago and has been running 8 weeks' Mindfulness programs as well as weekly Mindfulness groups since.

Attachment and Boundaries in the Digital Age

Presented by Linda Cundy
Sunday, 17th May 2015

Synopsis: Digital technology has radically changed the ways we live, work, and relate - relationships are made and maintained online. John Bowlby insisted that we feel secure and function best when we have access to the support of our attachment figures. With so many ways to connect, we never need to feel alone. But technology can also lead to boundary intrusions, misunderstanding, and alienation. In the first part of this day we will reflect on the influence of mobile phones, email, social network sites and the online world in our own lives and those of our clients. In the afternoon we turn our attention to the impact of communication technology on the practice of counselling and psychotherapy, again from an attachment perspective. In particular, we will explore the links between insecure attachment, relationship with technology, and therapeutic boundaries, emphasising the importance of assessment. Come prepared to reflect on the place of digital technology in both your personal and professional life.

Biography: Linda Cundy is an attachment-based psychoanalytic psychotherapist in private practice. She has taught for two decades on counselling and psychotherapy courses and is also an independent trainer specialising in attachment, human development, and clinical practice. She is Course Director and lead tutor of the Post-Graduate Diploma in Attachment-based Therapy, and consultant to the Foundation Diploma in Attachment-based Counselling, both at the Wimbledon Guild, and chair of Hackney Bereavement Service. She has contributed to and edited a book, "Love in the Age of the Internet: Attachment in the Digital Era" published by Karnac.

Trauma

Presented by Morit Heitzler
Tuesday, 12th May 2015

Synopsis: One of the most excruciating aspects of trauma is the invasion or collapse of boundaries, not just in the moment of trauma, but as lasting damage. Traumatised clients usually bring to therapy an ongoing background feeling of threat: both to physical and emotional survival and to their sense of identity. Not knowing where "I" end and the "Other" begins, creates chaos and confusion in the client's inner world, which echoes strongly in the therapeutic relationship. Therefore, most methods of trauma therapy are highly concerned with re-building and establishing safe, containing boundaries as the foundation of any therapeutic work. However, is it really possible to by-pass the client's embodied experience of shattered safety by introducing safe therapeutic boundaries? Can we, as therapists, contain the impact of trauma without engaging with chaos, confusion and vulnerability in the consulting room? This presentation will explore the paradoxical nature of boundaries and containment and their role in trauma therapy.

Biography: Morit is an experienced therapist, supervisor and trainer with a private practice in Oxford. Through her work in Israel, at the Traumatic Stress Service of the Maudsley Hospital, London, and at the Oxford Stress and Trauma Centre, Morit developed an integrative approach to trauma work, incorporating - within an overall relational perspective - Somatic Trauma Therapy, Body Psychotherapy, attachment theory, EMDR, modern neuroscience and Family Constellations. More information can be found on her website: www.heitzler.co.uk.

Annual General Meeting

The Cedars, Whiteknights Campus
Tuesday, 28th April 2015
7.30-9.30pm

Member Event: 2016 is a special year as we will be celebrating our 30th year as a Group. We would very much like the members to be present to put together some ideas about how to celebrate this great achievement. All members are expected to reply and let us know whether you will be attending or not so that we may manage administration, refreshments and the room.

AGENDA

  1. Apologies for Absence
  2. Minutes of the previous AGM
  3. Chairman's Report
  4. Treasurer's Report
  5. Vice-Chairman's Report
  6. Election/re-election of Committee Members
  7. 2014 Programme Review
  8. 2015 Programme
  9. 2016 30th Year Celebrations
  10. Any Other Business
  11. Date of next AGM

Bion

Presented by Chris Mawson
Tuesday, 10th March 2015

Synopsis: Chris Mawson will talk about and discuss with participants the clinical significance of the work of the psychoanalyst and thinker Wilfred Bion. Wilfred Bion (1897 - 1979) was a potent and original contributor to psychoanalysis. Like Melanie Klein, his clinical thinking was rooted firmly in that of Freud. He was one of the first to analyse patients in psychotic states using an unmodified analytic technique; he extended existing theories of projective processes and developed new conceptual tools. Chris Mawson's introduction will centre on the most clinically useful of Bion's ideas, namely:

  1. the inter-related concepts of Container-Contained ( ♀ ♂ ) and the oscillation within this 'structure' of Klein's two positions (Ps ↔ D).
  2. the complex ways in which the mental products of such relationships can furnish models, or 'preconceptions' for the individual, which when 'mated' with emotional experiences felt to be realizations of them, can promote psychically real concepts capable of growth. This is what Bion meant by 'alpha function'. The idea is based upon the necessity for the infant in distress to find a real person willing and able to take in and to suffer the emotional impact and disturbance of the projection of it, including the sense of concreteness and indigestibility, without refusing or running away. His wartime experiences had contributed to this understanding in the most convincing way possible. When he read that Klein had stated that the first projective identification of the infant is his fear of imminent destruction, Bion - with his wartime experiences of terror, had no trouble believing the truth of it.

If there is time, Chris will also discuss Bion's recommendations on Method.

Biography: CHRIS MAWSON is a training and supervising analyst of the British Psychoanalytical Society and works in private practice as a psychoanalyst. He worked initially with young children and adolescents, first at the Tavistock Clinic and later in the Child Psychiatry Department of the Paddington Green Children's Hospital in the days when children at that clinic were offered intensive psychoanalytic treatment. His first training was as a clinical psychologist, with a research interest in attention and manic depressive psychosis. As well as the clinical practice of psychoanalysis, he is interested in the study of groups and organizations from a psychoanalytic perspective, particularly that pursued by those of the British Group Relations orientation. He is the Editor of The Complete Works of W.R. Bion (2015), And Bion Today (2010), in the New Library of Psychoanalysis series. Other publications include: "The Use of Play Technique in Understanding Disturbed Behaviour in School" (Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy , Vol. 2, No. 1, 1986); "Containing Anxiety in Work with Damaged Children" (in The Unconscious at Work , ed. A. Obholzer & V. Z. Roberts, 1994); and "Pseudo-Free Association: The Sophisticated Analytic Patient and 'As-If' Relating" (British Journal of Psychotherapy , Vol. 18, No. 4, 2002).

Countertransference With Difficult Clients

Presented by Hadassah Davis
Tuesday, 10th February 2015

Synopsis: "Scene follows scene, and character follows character in bits and pieces across the hysteric's stage". Christopher Bollas, [Hysteria, 2000]
Patients create emotional responses in us and these responses are one of the most important tools of our work. If a psychotherapist or psychodynamic counsellor tries to work without consulting their feelings, their interpretations are likely to be poor and of little benefit. The best thing we can do in our consulting rooms is to quieten our being, say less, and listen to what our patients make us feel inside.
However, the traditional role of therapist as a neutral observer who delivers helpful interpretations from a position of evenly suspended attention doesn't help 'beyond borderline' patients and can leave the therapist feeling mad, fearful, fractured, even destroyed.
So can we, should we, utilise countertransference feelings with every patient? Are there, in fact, patients that we cannot help? And what do we do if we find we have such a patient in our private practice?

Biography: Hadassah Davis is a psychoanalytic psychotherapist in private practice in Reading and a supervisor for South Bucks Counselling Service. She has a diploma in supervision from the Society of Analytical Psychology and is a professional member of the Association for Group and Individual Psychotherapy (AGIP). She has been an active member of AGIP's training committee for many years and currently has responsibility for teaching AGIP trainees on how to successfully write their final qualifying paper. Hadassah is also a rabbi and has worked in both the Reform and Liberal Jewish movements as a congregational rabbi, educator and community developer. Hadassah has had work published on Jewish history, ethics, and creative liturgy.

Autistic traits presented in the therapy room

Presented by Caroline Hearst
Tuesday, 13th January 2015

Synopsis: Caroline will talk about the traits of autism, how they can present in therapy and why it is important for therapists and counsellors to have a good understanding of autism even if they have no clients who come with an autism diagnosis.

Biography: Caroline Hearst is an autistic autism trainer and consultant who offers an informed insider perspective on autism. She qualified as an art-psychotherapist and has worked in a variety of jobs including librarian, trade union recruiter, and adult educator. On discovering that she was autistic five years ago Caroline became active in the autistic community, while living in New Zealand she was a trustee of ASK - Autism Spectrum Kiwis and edited their "Welcome booklet" for newly diagnosed autistics. She is currently a National Autistic Society councillor, helps organise Autscape www.autscape.org.uk an annual conference run by and for autistics as well as being a director of AutAngel www.autangel.org.uk and running Autism Matters www.autismmatters.org.uk. Caroline has written about autism and therapy in Therapy Today and The Psychotherapist.

Safeguarding in the therapy setting

Presented by Louise Connelly
Tuesday, 9th November 2014

Synopsis: Recognising that there is no legislation for Safeguarding in Counselling and Psychotherapy Louise aims to identify our role in the safeguarding of children and vulnerable groups. Initially identifying our understanding of safeguarding and then highlighting aspects of law that are relevant to counselling and psychotherapy. Learning outcomes: awareness for safeguarding yourself, awareness for safeguarding others, who to contact, references/resources followed by Q&A.

Biography: Louise Connelly is the Wokingham Safeguarding Children Board Manager. Prior to taking up this position Louise worked as a Policy & Strategy Officer in Adult Social Services at Wokingham Borough Council for 9 years, working mainly on carers issues and with learning disabled adults. She also worked as a Senior Policy Officer at the Local Government Association, a lobbying organisation for local authorities, in the Children's Department. Louise gained a degree in Politics from the University of Essex. She is a wife and mother to two children and has a passion for climbing mountains, culminating in climbing Mount Kilimanjaro two years ago.

DSMV: 'Differential Diagnosis PTSD/BPD'

Presented by Doris Tallon
Tuesday, 11th November 2014

Synopsis: Her research examines how Trauma and PTSD/CPTSD is dealt with amongst patients with BPD symptomatology. The project commenced with an extensive review of patient records from West Berkshire Trust hospitals, followed by interviews with practicing clinicians. A new trauma screening instrument for BPD (BTERS) was then developed and tested against DSM standard assessments.

Biography: Doris Tallon is a Consultant Psychological Trauma Therapist specializing in Complex PTSD, and has worked for a number of years at the Berkshire Traumatic Stress Centre in Erleigh Road. Doris qualified from Goldsmith College obtaining an MSc in CBT and is currently nearing completion a research project for a PhD in Oxford Brookes.

Presentation of clinical material: how it impacts the supervisory relationship and how that relationship ultimately impacts the work

Presented by Phillip Harris
Tuesday, 14 October 2014

Synopsis: In this seminar we will consider how we use supervision and look at two different ways of presenting clinical material. One being the verbatim presentation: " ...she said….I said…she said..." etc. the other being a less organised way of presenting where different themes of the session are discussed; but not necessarily in chronological order. We will consider some of the benefits and limitations of these ways of bringing clinical material to supervision: of how they impact the supervisory relationship; and how that in turn impacts the therapeutic relationship. One of the roles of the supervisor is to promote the development of the supervisee. I believe the way this occurs will have a particular influence on the clinical work. We will also discuss the so called "parallel process" in supervision and how it in relates to the topic.

Biography: Phil Harris began as a bereavement counsellor in 1993 prior to training at the WPF London where he graduated in 1999 with an advanced diploma. He subsequently completed an MA in psychodynamic studies which focussed on the benefits of non-interpretive work. He later completed a diploma in supervision and in 2005 joined the British Association of Psychoanalytic and Psychodynamic Supervisors. Although his core training is psychodynamic he has experienced working across modalities both as a supervisor and supervisee. He is a member of FPC, UKCP, and BPC. He is also a senior accredited member of BACP.

He currently works in private practice in High Wycombe as a psychodynamic psychotherapist, clinical supervisor and mentor of counselling and psychotherapy work. He also supervises at Chiltern and Harrow Counselling centres and runs workshops which include: "An Introduction to Time limited Counselling"; "Experiences in the Erotic" (working with loving feelings in the room); "How we can benefit from an understanding of Bion's notion of going into a session without Memory, Desire and Understanding?"; "The Difficulties With Making Transference Interpretations"; and "Non-interpretive Work Within a Psychodynamic Context."

A RELATIONAL PSYCHOANALYTIC APPROACH TO SUPERVISING ISSUES IN BRIEF THERAPY

Doing and Supervising Brief Therapy / Counselling using one's Internal Supervisor as an enhancement of one to one Supervision

Presented by Ana Gaboleiro
Tuesday, 8 July 2014

Synopsis: In this presentation I will attempt to illustrate how the psychoanalytic approach can contribute to the supervision of brief therapy / counselling. Psychoanalysis does provide essential technical instruments which are just part of human relationships and human communication. If we can be flexible and humble enough to acknowledge this and tactful enough to take such tools out of the typical psychoanalytic setting and use them more widely, it can be a very enriching experience for everyone. My focus is on the dynamics of the supervisory relationship to try to enrich our understanding of the clinical material, while attempting to contain any overwhelming feelings and create space for sharing material and perceptions in a palatable manner.

I will be using some material from an article I wrote that was published in the BAPPS review last Spring.

Biography: I am a psychoanalytic psychotherapist and supervisor, with my own private practice. I have extensive experience working with a culturally diverse client group. I am also experienced in working with severe emotional distress, undertaking intensive psychodynamic crisis interventions with individuals experiencing both acute and enduring mental health problems. I have also been working as a counsellor, in a few different settings i.e. GP's Surgeries and Mothertongue, a small charity with a multi-lingual cross-cultural team, which offers holistic support to people from a wide range of cultural backgrounds, including black and minority ethnic communities, refugee and asylum seekers.

'Feeling for' and 'Feeling with' - developmental and neuroscientific perspectives on inter-subjectivity and empathy

Presented by Jean Knox
Tuesday, 10 June 2014

Synopsis: This lecture discuss research by Beatrice Beebe, Bessel van der Kolk and others, exploring the interpersonal processes that underpin early relational trauma and how this contributes to adult psychopathology. An essential feature of early relational trauma, the infant's experience of being unable to evoke an empathic response from the caregiver and the feelings of shame this gives rise to, is discussed and its implications for psychotherapy are considered. The neuroscience that underpins two forms of empathy in the therapeutic relationship, of 'feeling for' and 'feeling with' the patient is discussed and explored in relation to the concordant and complementary countertransference. I argue that when therapists respond to the projection onto them of the abuser by an increasingly determined adherence to analytic technique, this may become a complementary countertransference identification with the abuser and an enactment of the abusive relationship

Biography: Dr Jean Knox is a psychiatrist and a Jungian analyst with a relational and attachment-based approach. She is a Training Analyst of the Society of Analytical Psychology, a Senior Member and Training Therapist of the British Association of Psychotherapists and former Editor-in -Chief of the Journal of Analytical Psychology. She has recently been appointed as Senior Lecturer and Assistant Professor at the University of Exeter, helping to run an academic clinical psychotherapy training- a Doctorate in Clinical Practice. She has written and taught extensively on the relevance of attachment theory and developmental neuroscience to psychotherapy theory and practice. Her book Archetype, Attachment, Analysis: Jungian Psychology and the Emergent Mind was published in 2003. Her book 'Self-Agency in Psychotherapy: Attachment, Autonomy and Intimacy' was published in December 2010, in the WW Norton Interpersonal Neurobiology series.

Erotic Transference

Presented by Joan Bristow
Tuesday, 13 May 2014

Synopsis: From a psychodynamic and psychoanalytical perspective this talk will explore the particular features of working with, and in, the erotic transference including the resultant countertransference feelings, in the therapeutic setting.

The erotic transference includes those sexual feelings the client projects or invests in the counsellor. The erotic countertransference includes the erotic feelings the therapist has about, and towards the client. This talk aims to explore ways of understanding the meaning of sexual feelings in a therapeutic setting, both in terms of the difficulties and the opportunities the presence of sexual feelings raises for the progress of the clinical work. We will explore how these feelings can be an important source of information and how we can make use of this information to help the client.

Biography: Joan Bristow began her counselling training over 18 years ago at Wokingham and District Counselling Service (now known as Berkshire Counselling Centre) and initially worked as a volunteer counsellor. She then went on to complete the Advanced (Graduate) Diploma at WPF in London. Joan works in private practice and is now a psychodynamic psychotherapist and a member of BACP (senior accredited) UKCP, BPC and BAPPS. She has just completed a MA on her special interest of working with adults who are on the autistic spectrum. She is also a qualified supervisor working in local counselling centres, supervising groups of counsellors and individual counsellors within her practice. She has a keen interest in training and has been involved locally teaching on Certificate and Diploma Courses, and has led many workshops.

Annual General Meeting

The Cedars, Whiteknights Campus
Tuesday, 29th April 2014
7.30-9.30pm

NOTICE is hereby given that the Annual General Meeting of Reading Therapies Group ('RTG') will take place on Tuesday 29 April 2014 at 7.30pm in Seminar Room 2, The Cedars, Whiteknights Campus, University of Reading. For directions see website: www.readingtherapiesgroup.bacp.co.uk

RTG would like to invite all our members who might be interested in finding out what we do and how we do it. The current Management Committee includes:

  • Debbie Livingston (Chair)
  • Anita Spark (Treasurer)
  • Katrina Likhtman (Deputy)
  • Finola Berger (Secretary)
  • Joy Abel
  • Jack Creagh
  • Barry Stebbings
  • Kim Parish

AGENDA

  1. Apologies for Absence
  2. Minutes of the previous AGM
  3. Chairman's Report
  4. Treasurer's Report
  5. Vice-Chairman's Report
  6. Election/re-election of Committee Members
  7. 2014 Programme Review
  8. 2015 Programme
  9. Any Other Business
  10. Date of next AGM

Half Day Workshop: Body to Body

Presented by Dr Susie Orbach
Saturday, 22 March (11am - 2pm)

The rise in body based problems, from eating disorders to cutting, questions conventional theory on the relationship of Body and Mind. Speaker will outline her new understandings of the development of the body and discuss the implications for practice where powerful body countertransference can occur. The workshop will include discussion of clinical material. Reading Bodies (winner of the APA Women in Psychology award) will be helpful to participants.

Places available see events page for further information.

The Many Faces of Self-Harm

Presented by Maggie Turp
Tuesday, 11 March 2014

Cancellation of evening Talk

We regret to say that our speaker for the Tuesday, 11th of March unfortunately is unable to come, due to ill health, and give us a talk any longer.  We have tried to find a replacement at short notice but could not find anyone available. Therefore with regret we have to cancel the talk this Tuesday.  We are hoping to schedule another interesting seminar and we will inform you when we know more. 

Synopsis: In most people's minds, the term 'self-harm' is associated with self-directed acts of violence, in particular self-cutting. Drawing on service user testimony and clinical examples, the speaker will argue for a broader conception of what constitutes self-harm. Focussing on the phenomenon of 'self-harm by omission' - where a person comes to harm as a result of inaction where action would be appropriate, rather than as result of action - she will discuss what different types of self-harm have in common and how 'hidden' self-harming behaviour might usefully be addressed in clinical practice.

I will be looking at the use of myth both in the sense of using pre-existent myths to aid therapeutic process as well as looking at our personal stories in a mythical way.

Biography: Dr. Maggie Turp is a Chartered Psychologist and Psychoanalytic Psychotherapist, currently in private practice. She previously held lectureships at the University of Reading and Birkbeck College London.

Maggie offers talks and training workshops for practitioners revolving around clinical themes. An enduring area of interest is the expression of psychological distress and disturbance in the physical domain of experience.

Maggie is a member of the Editorial Boards of the journals 'Psychodynamic Practice' and 'Infant Observation' Her publications include journal papers and two books, 'Psychosomatic Health: the body and the word' (2001 Palgrave) and 'Hidden Self-Harm: narratives from psychotherapy' (2003 Jessica Kingsley). She welcomes correspondence at maggieturp@googlemail.com.

Group Schema Therapy (GST) in the Treatment of Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD)

Presented by Dr Astrid Ingham Brooke
Tuesday, 11 February 2014

Synopsis: Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) was once considered to be untreatable and, although there have been several therapeutic approaches which have been helpful with managing symptoms, there have been few studies showing effective treatment of the underlying disorder. Recent research by Dr Arnold Arntz, Dr Joan Farrell and others have shown the effectiveness of Schema Therapy with this patient group and they are currently conducting a global Randomised Control Trial (RCT) evaluating the effectiveness of Group Schema Therapy (GST) in regular mental health settings. Dr Ingham Brooke is the Principal Investigator for the Bracknell BHFT site for this study. In this talk, Astrid will give an overview of Schema Therapy concepts and clinical approaches to BPD, including the use of mode work.

Biography: Dr Astrid Ingham Brooke is a Consultant Clinical Psychologist and Lead Psychologist for AMH (Adult Mental Health) Bracknell Locality in Berkshire and has a private practice in Windsor. Although originally English, Astrid lived for many years in Australia, and completed her first two degrees at the University of Sydney. Clinically, she has extensive experience of working with anxiety disorders, psychological trauma, and the management of chronic pain. For the past fifteen years she has focused on personality disorders and complex cases, specialising in Schema Therapy for the past five years. Astrid is an experienced Schema Therapist and is accredited at the Advanced Level with the International Society for Schema Therapy (ISST).

The DSM - a great work of fiction? A Study of why psychiatry has become bad for our mental health.

Presented by Dr James Davies
Tuesday, 14th January 2014

Synopsis: Why is psychiatry such big business? Why are so many psychiatric drugs prescribed, and why, without solid scientific justification, has the number of mental disorders risen from 106 in 1952, to 374 today? In this talk, Dr James Davies takes us behind the scenes of how the psychiatrist's bible, the DSM, was actually written - did science drive the construction of new mental disorder categories like ADHD, major depression and Aspergers? - or were less-scientific and more dubious processes at play? His exclusive interviews with the creators of the DSM reveal the troubling answer.

Biography: Dr James Davies is a senior lecturer in social anthropology and psychotherapy at the University of Roehampton. He obtained his doctorate from the University of Oxford and is an accredited member of the UKCP. He is the author of many articles and books including The Importance of Suffering: The Value and Meaning of Emotional Discontent and Cracked: Why Psychiatry is Doing More Harm than Good.

Suicide - Who's killing Whom?

Presented by Rob Hale
Tuesday, 10th December 2013

Synopsis: In this presentation I will look at the unconscious motivations behind acts of suicide and compare them with acts of self mutilation. I will describe a process applicable to all suicides but also different personality structures which can lead to the final common pathway of the act. I will describe the impact of both completed and uncompleted suicide on the professional treating such people.

Biography: Rob Hale FRCPsych. M.Inst Psychoanal. I have worked at the Portman Clinic (and Tavistock Clinic) since 1980. My interest has always been in the mechanisms which propel an individual to act out perverse or violent phantasies. My clinical interest has thus been in the areas of paedophilia, violence and suicide. More recently I have been concerned with the effect of the psychopathic mind on the institution which contains them and on the mental health of those charged with their care.

Psychosis and Spirituality: taking experience seriously.

By Isabel Clarke
Tuesday 12th November

Synopsis: Grounded in experience, psychosis and spirituality will be considered as terms referring to the crossing of a threshold that is available to all human beings. For some, this journey is life enhancing; for others challenging, but ultimately transformative; but there are no guarantees and a potential to get lost. A non-reductionist, cognitive science based, way of understanding the availability of this area of experiencing will be introduced, as well as ways of managing the threshold safely and helping those who find themselves lost on the far side.

Biography: Isabel Clarke is a consultant clinical psychologist, with 20 years experience in the NHS. She is currently lead for a project to embed a psychological therapeutic approach across the acute care service in the NHS Trust she works for. The psychology of spirituality, the centrality of spirituality to mental health issues and the light that the relationship between psychosis and spirituality can shed on this, are particular areas of interest.  Her books, the edited,  Psychosis and Spirituality; Consolidating the new Paradigm (Wiley 2010)and Madness, Mystery and the Survival of God (2008, O-Books) explore the themes of spirituality, mental health and being human. See her website: www.isabelclarke.org for more information on publications and activities.

Intersubjectivity

Presented by Julia Ryde
Tuesday, 15th October 2013

Synopsis: Intersubjectivity - how do we define it? and what different perspectives do we have on it? does our theoretical background and training make a difference to how we are available to another in the consulting room. Empathy, countertransference, intuition are ways of describing how we achieve an understanding of another person's state of mind.

Working with trauma and disturbed patients, the experience of the other may be disassociated or  on a scale of something still unrepresented. How does a state of mind get through to us ? Is it through the body, images - the capacity of the therapist to 'tune in' to the unconscious wavelengths. What goes on between therapist and patient is reputedly difficult to get hold of, to speak about or write about. We use words which are discrete symbolic entities for experiences which are often beyond the self.

In this talk I want to explore with you the different ways of thinking about connecting intersubjectively. It will cover my journey into research; different ways of thinking and being; and clinical examples, from my practice and hopefully yours too, to clarify these points. I will refer to the work of Daniel Stern and the Boston Group Jung, Matte Blanco, Michael Robbins, Botella.

Biography: Julia Ryde trained as a Jungian analyst at the British Association of Psychotherapy now the British Psychotherapy Foundation. She is a senior member who has held various positions in the organisation and has recently stepped down as chair of Training. Her core profession was art therapy and she has extensive experience working in the field of mental health: in the NHS, a therapeutic community and GP surgeries.
Her background was in art and it has been a lifelong interest which has continued through her practise as an art therapist and Jungian analyst. She has supervised and taught both art therapists and psychotherapists and run Infant Observation seminars for a joint MSc programme ( BPF and Birkbeck) called The Psychodynamics of Human Development. Recent interests include intersubjectivity and the work of Daniel Stern and the Boston group and she is in a research group titled 'Exploring intersubjective moments in Psychotherapy - the influence of 'Moments of Meeting' on outcomes'. She also belongs to an interest group who are exploring Unrepresentability in psychotherapeutic work, especially in the area of trauma.

The impact of pregnancy on the therapeutic space

Presented by Anne Reilly
Tuesday, 11th June 2013

Synopsis: Pregnancy is a ubiquitous experience marking the creation of new life and the transformation of adult roles, responsibilities and psychological inner worlds. The extent of such processes within the potential parents and wider family network is of course variable, depending upon numerous factors such as socio-economic context, past life experiences and attachment histories, personality, health, ethnicity and so on. The continuing universal nature of this process allowing for the advent of recent reproductive technologies serves as a common life experience between people.

As such pregnancy is akin to the psychoanalytic notion of a 'fact of life' (Money-Kyrle, 1968; Steiner, 1993), something that is essential to our being, which can inevitably stir up profound feelings and defences. When this idea is applied to group analytic psychotherapy, news of the pregnancy of a member can ignite early defences, painful affect states and self-experiences.

This talk will centre initially on addressing the psychological impact of pregnancy in general within the individual and family matrix, using Winnicott's (1956) ideas of maternal pre-occupation. I will then debate this concept alongside O'Shaughnessy's (1992) ideas on Enclaves and Excursions, to help us think more about the impact of sex and procreation on the group matrix.

Whilst clinical material will be drawn from an analytic group, I hope to widen the debate to include the impact of a pregnancy on the therapeutic space not just with patients but also therapists too. Men will not be forgotten and I hope the male perspective can be included and discussed too.

Biography: Anne Reilly is a consultant psychotherapist and group analyst working within the NHS in Berkshire. Her interest in thinking about the impact of pregnancy within the therapeutic arena began in her group training, due to having a pregnant group member within the analytic group. This phenomenon then became the focus of her dissertation.

The Many Faces of Self-Harm

Presented by Maggie Turp

Rescheduled for 2014

Annual General Meeting

The Cedars (was Black Horse House)
23rd April 2013
7.30-9.30pm

NOTICE is hereby given that the Annual General Meeting of Reading Therapies Group ('RTG') will take place on Tuesday 23 April 2013 at 7.30pm in Seminar Room 2, The Cedars (was Black Horse House), Whiteknights Campus, University of Reading. For directions see website: www.readingtherapiesgroup.bacp.co.uk

RTG would like to invite all our members who might be interested in finding out what we do and how we do it. The current Management Committee includes:

  • Debbie Livingston (Chair)
  • Anita Spark (Treasurer)
  • Katrina Likhtman (Deputy)
  • Finola Berger (Secretary)
  • Joy Abel
  • Jack Creagh
  • Barry Stebbings
  • Lauraine Leigh

AGENDA

  1. Apologies for Absence
  2. Minutes of the previous AGM
  3. Chairman's Report
  4. Treasurer's Report
  5. Vice-Chairman's Report
  6. Election/re-election of Committee Members
  7. 2013 Programme Review
  8. 2014 Programme
  9. Any other business
  10. Date of next AGM

Fathers Re-Visioned: Clinical, Political and Personal Perspectives

Presented by Andrew Samuels
Saturday, 16th March 2013

Synopsis: I started work on 'fathers' in 1977 and the situation has changed a lot since then. Men as a whole have come much more under scrutiny and object relations theory, which was mother-centred, has expanded greatly. Now we talk of the 'good-enough father'. However, many clinicians and writers are rather conventional when it comes to the father. They tend to stress his damaging and malevolent aspects, focusing on such things as 'the absent father' or on sexual abuse. But what do ordinary, devoted, benevolent and constructive fathers offer to their children? (And what do they gain from being a parent?) This is less easy to find in the literature. And there is a lot of idealisation of the 'normal' father which leads to a condemnation on psychological (as well as on political) grounds of lone parent families, singleton fathers, and when two people of the same sex parent together.

In no other area of psychotherapy do the psychology and the politics come together so emphatically. There's a lot of professional and political prejudice around. The purpose of the day is to clarify our thinking about the father, with special reference to his body, in both aggressive and erotic contexts. Please bring clinical material you think will be relevant - and also bring your own memories of the presence and absence of 'father' in your life. Let's hope that many fathers will show up to this event, which is suitable for any counsellor, , psychologist, psychotherapist, analyst - or interested mental health professional and informed member of the general public. You might be interested in the recording of a TV programme I made on fathers and sons ('I want my Dad back'). Go to www.andrewsamuels.com, then to Video Lectures, then to second page of Video Lectures, then click on image.

Biography: Andrew Samuels is a Jungian Analyst, university professor, author, activist and political consultant. He is the immediate past chair of the United Kingdom Council for Psychotherapy. Co-founder of Psychotherapists and Counsellors for Social Responsibility and of the Alliance for Counselling and Psychotherapy. His books have been translated into 19 languages and relevant titles include The Plural Psyche: Personality, Morality and the Father; The Political Psyche; and Politics on the Couch.

The uses of Mythology in Transpersonal Psychotherapy

Presented by Paul Margrie
Tuesday, 12th March 2013

Synopsis: Myth is one of the avenues that, in Jungian terms, opens us to the collective unconscious and the realm of archetypal experience. Myth is also one way of discovering the creative imagination; or indeed a way in which the creative imagination communicates with us. Creative imagination is the primary facet that defines the Transpersonal approach to therapy and distinguishes its methodology from other forms of therapy.

I will be looking at the use of myth both in the sense of using pre-existent myths to aid therapeutic process as well as looking at our personal stories in a mythical way.

Biography: Paul Margrie: I have been working as a psychotherapist for over 20 years. My engagement with this work began when I was living in Eire where I owned an organic smallholding and ran a landscape gardening business. I got involved in Co Counselling and found that I truly loved working with people. For about 4 years I ran men's groups in Eire and was becoming more and more involved in therapeutic work. In 1992 I decided it was time to get serious and train properly to be a psychotherapist. I returned to the U.K. after nearly 20 years away and spent the next 5 years training at CCPE (The Centre for Counselling and Psychotherapy Education). I qualified in 1997 and have since completed a supervisor training programme and an Advanced Diploma in Transpersonal Psychotherapy. Currently I run a busy private practice; supervise individuals and groups; teach and facilitate at CCPE; and am a member of the Management Committee at CCPE. I was until recently the CCPE representative to the UKCP and the BACP.

Transgenerational Trauma and the Body

Presented by Morit Heitzler
Tuesday, 12th February 2013

Synopsis: Over recent years it has become increasingly clear - through our own practice as well as through contributions by neuroscience - that trauma is not only remembered, but also communicated via the body. Via mirror neurons, the client's internal state is mapped and represented within the therapist's bodymind system. 'Vicarious traumatisation' can occur when the therapist absorbs clients' trauma non-verbally and subliminally, and thus accumulates unprocessed trauma in their own body.

What is not yet sufficiently recognised is that the same process occurs between children and parents. Children subliminally perceive their parents' unconsciously held trauma states and absorb these into their body where they become part of the child's internal psychological structure. This process is the basis for the transgenerational replication of trauma, often across several generations. The body is the crucial communicator and carrier of trauma, and a main avenue for accessing and addressing it.

This evening will offer counsellors and therapists from across the modalities and orientations an introduction to the role of the body in trauma work generally, and the recognition of transgenerational trauma in particular. Morit will cover some basic theory and then present a particular technique for establishing significant transgenerational dynamics and working with them.

Biography: Morit is an experienced therapist, supervisor and trainer with a private practice in Oxford.

She offers both short- and long-term work with a wide range of clients from diverse backgrounds. Morit specialises in trauma work, and has developed her own integrative approach, incorporating - within an overall relational perspective - Somatic Trauma Therapy, Body Psychotherapy, attachment theory, EMDR, modern neuroscience and Family Constellations.

Through her work in Israel, at the Traumatic Stress Service of the Maudsley Hospital, London, and at the Oxford Stress and Trauma Centre, Morit has gained a wealth of experience in treating traumatised clients, including refugees and asylum seekers, suffering from a wide variety of PTSD symptoms. She has been making a contribution to the profession by teaching on various training courses in the UK and in Israel and she regularly leads workshops and groups. More information about her work and publications is available on her website www.heitzler.co.uk.

Winnicott from the start: the impact of Primitive Emotional Development

Presented by Jan Harvie-Clark
Tuesday, 15th January 2013

Synopsis: I will look at the main points of Winnicott's paper 'Primitive emotional development', together with his emphasis on the mother's 'primary maternal preoccupation'.

I will then differentiate Freud's and Klein's ideas of early infantile development, and look at some neuroscientific evidence; and offer an evaluation and discussion of the clinical use of all this.

Biography: I trained as a psychodynamic counsellor at Highgate Counselling Centre in 1979 and remain a staff member, holding a weekly supervison group. In 1985 I began training with the BAP as a psychoanalytic psychotherapist, and added an adolescent training. I am now a training analyst of the British Psychoanalytic Association, which is now, since 2009, a component society of the International Psychoanalytic Association. I live and work in northwest London.

I have a full time private practice and enjoy teaching and supervising at both introductory and professional levels.

Introduction to Transactional Analysis

Presented by Linda Fenwick
Tuesday, 11th December 2012

Synopsis: TA is a theory of personality that offers a paradigm to help us understand how people communicate, interact and form repeated habitual patterns of relationship and behaviours. It is currently applied in a wide variety of settings and can be used educationally and organisationally as well as clinically.

In the clinical setting TA offers various theoretical constructs of child development and psychopathology and a system of therapy that is appropriate for the treatment of a wide range of relational difficulties, from here and now problems and neuroses through to psychoses and personality disorder.

This presentation offers an overview of the T.A model including its origins and underpinning philosophy, its key theoretical concepts and its application in the clinical setting. Information will be presented in the form of Power Point slides and through didactic discussion. Copies of the Power Point presentation can be made available by request via email.

Biography: Linda Fenwick is a qualified Transactional Analyst and Cognitive Analytic therapist and has been working in the field of mental health since 1988. She currently works for the NHS as a Principal Adult Psychotherapist within Berkshire Psychotherapy Service, offering both individual and group treatments.

Linda has many years' experience of working with people with complex needs, in particular as a group therapist in the Winterbourne Therapeutic Community. She has previously worked with young people aged between 12 and 18 years at the Berkshire Adolescent Unit and as a Family Worker for Daisy's Dream, a charitable Trust for bereaved children and their families in Berkshire. Linda has also had ten years' experience of running her own private practice and has worked within a variety of multi-national organisations offering Transactional Analysis as the basis for management training courses and individual coaching sessions.

Relinquishing the Symptom: The function and treatment of symptoms manifesting in addictions work

Presented by John Beveridge
Tuesday, 13th November 2012

Synopsis: We ask a lot of the patients when we expect them to surrender their symptoms and recover. Using examples from my clinical experience, I would like to compare how the manifestation of symptoms has a similar function in the way an addiction operates as a protection against pain and loss.

By observing the secondary gains in being ill and decoding the communication behind the behaviour a person uses when they act out in the repetition compulsion, we can discover the story of a person's life, flush out the trauma, and facilitate mourning. This requires the spiritual values of surrender, acceptance and forgiveness, often for themselves.

In this talk I would like to explore our own self-care until the energetic exchange can happen between therapist and client which can allow the patient to move on.

Biography: John Beveridge has a practice in both central and North London offering one to one therapy with a psychoanalytic, attachment-based approach. He runs groups for and teaches, therapists in training in the field of sex and love addiction and supervises therapists and group leaders. For over thirty years John has worked with people recovering from chemical and sexual addiction.

What leads a therapist to make a Boundary Violation: an exploration of the factors involved in a complex ethical issue

Presented by Lou Corner
Tuesday, 16th October 2012

Synopsis: As the title suggests, the presentation will consider some of the factors that lead a therapist to violate a boundary in their work with a patient. It will consider what is meant by a "boundary violation", from seemingly minor violations to serious violations, and will use clinical examples, and examples from ethical cases to illustrate.

Biography: Lou Corner is a psychoanalyst working in private practice in Reading. She is a member of the British Psychoanalytic Association and a Fellow of the British Association of Psychotherapists. She has been Chair of the Ethics Committee of the BAP and was the first Chair of the Complaints Hearing Panel for the British Psychoanalytic Council. She has and continues to teach trainees in the BAP and BPA on ethical matters. She also teaches in London and Dublin on Supervision Courses in which she also considers with students the ethical issues concerned in setting up a supervisory contract.

Now you see it...now you don't - a history of psychological trauma

Presented by Suzanna Rose
Tuesday, 12th June 2012

Synopsis: This presentation examines the long history of sequelae to psychological trauma and links this to the relatively new diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder. Aside from a historical perspective it will also present current clinical interventions and future directions.

Biography: Suzanna Rose is currently Head of Research and Development and a Consultant Psychological Therapist at Berkshire Healthcare Foundation NHS Trust. She originally trained as a general nurse and health visitor and then under undertook her psychotherapeutic training at the University of Reading and subsequently took her doctorate at the University of London.

Her clinical area is in treating post-traumatic stress disorder and she started the NHS Berkshire Traumatic Stress Service in 1999 where she continues to work one day a week. She is on the Board of the Thames Valley Comprehensive Local Research Network. She was part of the original bid team for IAPT in Berkshire and also for setting up the joint training programme with the Charlie Waller Institute at the University of Reading where she teaches on the mental health care of military veterans. She is also currently the NHS Clinical Champion for Military Veterans for Berks, Bucks, Oxon, Hants and the Isle of Wight. She has been a volunteer member of the British Red Cross for more than 30 years and has specialised in working with the psycho social aspects of disaster both in this country and overseas. She is currently Vice President of Berkshire Red Cross. She has published extensively and spoken at conferences in many parts of the world.

Working with Elderly Clients

Presented by Charles Rigby and Mari Longworth
Tuesday, 15th May 2012

Synopsis: This talk will focus on the NHS service, Older Peoples Mental Health Liaison Team (OPMHLT) which has been operational for over one year and is based at the Royal Berkshire Hospital. The OPMHLT is provided for older people ( ie those aged 65 years or more) with mental health needs in physical care settings at the Royal Berkshire Hospital, Reading, Berkshire. Older people are referred into the service when experiencing some or one of the following: Psychological and emotional problems; Behavioural problems including: agitation and wandering; Feeling very sad or depressed a lot of the time; Feeling scared, worried or anxious a lot of the time; Thoughts of self-harm; Confusion; Memory problems; Thoughts that are distressing or unusual.

The OPMHLT aims to provide a multidisciplinary, specialist mental health service for assessment and evidence based treatments for older patients. Our role extends beyond patient contact into education of medical colleagues to promote the needs of patients with psychiatric symptoms presenting in general hospital settings. This service will work closely with the staff at the Royal Berkshire Hospital, GP surgeries, local authorities, community mental health services, care homes and voluntary services. The support offered by the service will depend on individual needs but will include aspects including: Consultation; Emotional and psychological; Support for service users and their relatives/carers; Medication; Memory assessment; Signposting to other appropriate services; Information and advice. As part of this evening's talk it may be useful to discuss some of the disorders predominantly depression, delirium and dementia that the team deal with.

Biography: Charles Rigby is a trained general and psychiatric nurse, of over 20 years' experience, who has worked in a wide range of settings. However, his forte has been working with older people. Charles has worked in a general hospital, then psychiatric unit, the community and now in general hospital RBH. His colleague Mari Longworth who is also dual trained ( psch/general) also has a broad knowledge and experience is hoping to assist with the presentation.

NHS Service pamphlet is available on line at: www.berkshirehealthcare.nhs.uk/opmhlt.pdf

Older People's Mental Health Liaison Team (OPMHLT)
Royal Berkshire Hospital
London Road
Reading, RG1 5AN

Tel: 0118 3228 320
Fax: 0118 3227 842
E-mail: opmhlt@berkshire.nhs.uk
Hours of service: 9am-5pm Monday to Friday (not including bank or public holidays)

Annual General Meeting

Tuesday, 17th April 2012

NOTICE is hereby given that the Annual General Meeting of Reading Therapies Group ('RTG') will take place on Tuesday 17 April 2012 at 7.30pm in Seminar Room 2, Black Horse House, Whiteknights Campus, University of Reading.

RTG would like to invite members who might be interested in finding out what we do and how we do it. The current Management Committee includes:

Debbie Livingston (Chair)
Anita Spark (Treasurer)
Katrina Likhtman (Deputy)
Finola Berger (Secretary)
Joy Abel
Jack Creagh
Barry Stebbings

AGENDA

  1. Apologies for Absence
  2. Minutes of the previous AGM
  3. Chairman's Report
  4. Treasurer's Report
  5. Vice-Chairman's Report
  6. Election/re-election of Committee Members
  7. 2012 Programme Review
  8. 2013 Programme
  9. Any other business
  10. Date of next AGM

Eating Disorders and Addictions

Presented by Gabrielle Epstein
Tuesday, 20th March 2012

Synopsis: This talk reviewed theoretical perspectives on alcohol and drug dependence and Eating Disorders including clinical and biological approaches and vulnerabilities. The focus is on commonalities across the disorders including co-morbidity with some attention paid to what are variously called 'cross-addiction' or 'process addictions'. Learnings from treating the two presentations in a shared programme will be outlined and useful treatment modalities will be explored. There will be opportunity for a general discussion.

Biography: Gabrielle is a Psychologist with over 25 years' experience specialising in substance misuse. Gabrielle has held many senior positions including Head Psychological Consultant at Odyssey House Therapeutic Community, Melbourne and Consultant Psychologist for the Western Healthcare Network Victoria. Gabrielle has lectured in post- graduate medical and pharmaceutical education and provided training and consultancy to police, mental health staff and a wide range of clinicians and organisations including advising on National Occupational Standards. Gabrielle has developed and implemented innovative service systems and has lead on clinical governance for a range of organisations. Gabrielle has been responsible for county wide treatment systems in the UK and has extensive experience in ensuring the delivery of high quality services; most recently as Deputy Director for the South East of England for Addiction one of the UK's largest addiction treatment providers.

How to Work When Therapy isn't Working

Presented by Michael Soth
Saturday, 25th February 2012

Synopsis: Michael Soth is an experienced therapist, supervisor and trainer who has been practising as well as teaching counsellors and psychotherapists for more than two decades. For many years he worked as Training Director of the Chiron Centre for Body Psychotherapy. He is a frequent presenter at professional conferences, and a selection of his publications and presentations are available at: www.soth.co.uk. He has been studying the significance of enactments and their therapeutic uses since the mid-1990's, and has developed a unique relational body/mind approach that builds on an integration of humanistic and psychoanalytic perspectives.

A CPD workshop designed for practitioners based upon a unique and powerful integration of therapeutic approaches. Suitable for practitioners from across the spectrum of therapeutic orientations and modalities. This workshop incorporates some of the necessary theoretical and practical tools to:

  • maximise your chances of turning therapeutic impasses and "stuckness" into productive engagement
  • survive challenges to your therapeutic position non-defensively and creatively
  • confront the client's resistances, avoidances and manipulations effectively
  • challenge 'acting out' and other attempts to undermine the therapeutic frame
  • access the unconscious and pre-reflexive roots of your client's relational style as well as other patterns, schemas and scripts

The work will be a fluid mixture of experiential, theoretical and skills practice as well as group process, in a variety of formats (pairs, triads, whole group, etc). All teaching will be supported by hand-outs and references. Attendance certificates are available on completion of the workshop (6hrs CPD)

Assessment of Asperger's in Adults

Presented by Trevor Powell
Tuesday, 21st February 2012

Synopsis: Assessment of adults with potential Asperger's Syndrome. There have been considerable advancements in the understanding of Asperger's Syndrome over the last five years, particularly with advances in neuroscience. The syndrome is a variation of Autism where the individual has poor social and emotional skills, but tends to have strong traits in systematizing, good memory for individual details and adherence to routines and special interests. Over the last two years an NHS service has been set up offering a diagnostic assessment service, which has been popular with clinicians and individuals who might want to understand their difficulties. This group of people often have unusual and extreme strengths and weaknesses, life is often a struggle, but there is usually some relief in finding understanding and a diagnosis.

Biography: Dr Trevor Powell is a Consultant Clinical Psychologist and Neuropsychologist who has worked in Berkshire for the last thirty years. He manages the Clinical Psychology Service for the Wokingham area and the Neuropsychology Service across the County. He has written books on mental health and brain injury (The Mental Health Handbook, Head Injury, A Practical Guide and The Brain Injury Workbook - Speechmark Press). His more recent clinical interest has been in the diagnostic assessment of adults with potential Asperger's Syndrome.

Working with chronic trauma Paradigm Change Programme

Presented by Bob Paxman (Talking2Minds)
Tuesday, 17th January 2012

Bob Paxman is a former SAS soldier and the CEO and founder of talking2minds who developed Complex PTSD following his service in the British Military. Having been prescribed a series of unsuccessful treatments for his condition he embarked on a quest to find a solution to his nightmares and flashbacks outside of the medical model.

Bob found his solution with a combination of results focussed alternative therapies that when amalgamated address the root cause of presenting symptomology at the level of autobiographical memory.

The charity Talking2minds has now successfully treated in excess of 350 clients and also focuses on assisting family members in the cessation of their coping strategies. An external validation of the process is on-going and the positive outcomes are now measured out to 7 years. http://www.talking2minds.co.uk

Gestalt

Presented by Simon Jacobs
Tuesday, 13th December 2011

Synopsis: The theory behind Gestalt Therapy takes the premise that Humans are meaning-making and social creatures. We look for patterns and are hard-wired to try to make sense of our experience rather than perceive life as a random series of unconnected events. As group animals we are always thinking of ourselves in relation to others. Even an isolated person feels that way as a result of the lack of contact with others. Rather than offer a monologue about Gestalt therapy, true to the dialogic nature of this approach, we shall as a group, explore the implications of this for therapy - how some of these assumptions that underpin Gestalt theory, lead us to a dialogic and 'here and now' approach. We shall also look at how, as an experiential approach to therapy, Gestalt experiments can be used to raise awareness of the internal conflicts and resistances that lead to depression, anxiety, relationship problems and other typical issues that we encounter in our clients.

Biography: I am a UKCP registered psychotherapist in private practice. With a background in art and creative design within the advertising industry, I bring my experience and interest in creativity to my work with individuals and groups, supporting growth through experimentation and self-expression. I currently run an on-going men¹s group and work at the Priory Hospital as a group psychotherapist running Psychodrama, supportive therapy and experiential groups.

I incorporate a variety of methodologies into my clinical work including aspects of CBT, TA, family constellations and psychodrama. I am particularly interested in relational ways of working within a gestalt framework and continue to be inspired by Gaie Houston's 'plain speaking' approach.

Sibling Transference

Presented by Prophecy Coles
Tuesday, 15th November 2011

Synopsis: Prophecy Coles will address the neglected subject of the sibling transference. The talk will give a history of its neglect in psychoanalytic theory and this will lead to a possible reason for its omission. She will illustrate her understanding of the sibling transference through clinical work and her own personal biography.

Biography: Prophecy Coles trained as a psychotherapist at the Lincoln Clinic. She is also a member of the London Centre for Psychotherapy. She published her first paper on Siblings, The Children in the Apple Tree, in the Australian Journal of Psychotherapy in 1998. This was followed by Karnac commissioning her book, The Importance of Sibling Relationships in Psychoanalysis, published in 2003. She has given many talks and published other papers on the subject since then. Her latest book is 'The Uninvited Guest from the Unremembered Past', published by Karnac, £14.99.

Pain, Shame and Empathy

Presented by Marcus Johns
Tuesday, 11th October 2011

Synopsis: In this presentation I will discuss some links between psychic pain and physical pain. Pain experienced by our patients has to be understood by using our empathy and a temporary conscious identification with the patient. I draw attention to some of the dangers inherent in our work when we are using this very necessary empathy and give a clinical example from my own experience

Biography: I trained in medicine at Charing Cross Hospital and then in psychiatry at the Maudsley Hospital. I then went into Child and Family Psychiatry at the Tavistock Clinic and became Director of the Child Guidance Training Centre within the Tavistock building. I was consultant in charge of the Day Unit for Disturbed Children. Most of my working life has been within the NHS. During this time I trained as a psychoanalyst and became Director of the London Clinic of Psychoanalysis. I now work privately as a psychoanalyst. I have maintained an interest in psychosomatic medicine and still attend a seminar at UCH on this subject.

An Introduction to Alchemy as a Model of Personal Transformation

Presented by Paul Margrie
Tuesday, 14th June 2011

Synopsis: "Only by discovering alchemy have I clearly understood that the Unconscious is a process and that ego's rapports with the unconscious and its contents initiate an evolution, more precisely a real metamorphoses of the psyche." CG Jung (Memories, Dreams and Reflections)

Alchemy is a symbolic representation of the individuation process. In alchemy, believes Jung, processes arising from the individual psyche are described encoded. Peculiar terms that alchemy operates with, such as prima materia, unus mundus, Mercurius, filium philosophorum, lapis and many more are decrypted by Jung through an arduous work of over 10 years and are described at length in his book "Psychology and Alchemy".

This short CPD course is intended to introduce the notion of using alchemical symbolism and maps to navigate the process of personal change and transformation. I will introduce a 4 stage process model with several components described in each stage. The primary motif of this model is the transformation of base metals, such as lead, into gold. In Transpersonal psychology we see this as a metaphor for therapeutic process.

This event will be of interest to anyone involved in the personal process of themselves or others. This is a psycho-spiritual model so there is an assumption that the totality of our being includes a spiritual dimension.

Biography: Paul Margrie: I am 55 years old and have been working as a psychotherapist for over 20 years. My engagement with this work began when I was living in Eire where I owned an organic smallholding and ran a landscape gardening business. I got involved in Co Counselling and found that I truly loved working with people. For about 4 years I ran men's groups in Eire and was becoming more and more involved in therapeutic work. In 1992 I decided it was time to get serious and train properly to be a psychotherapist. I returned to the U.K. after nearly 20 years away and spent the next 5 years training at CCPE (The Centre for Counselling and Psychotherapy Education). I qualified in 1997 and have since completed a supervisor training programme and an Advanced Diploma in Transpersonal Psychotherapy. Currently I run a busy private practice; supervise individuals and groups; teach and facilitate at CCPE; and am a member of the Management Committee at CCPE. I was until recently the CCPE representative to the UKCP and the BACP.

Understanding Sexual Dysfunction:
A TRAINING MASTERCLASS

Presented by Dr Glyn Hudson-Allez
Saturday, 21st May 20111
9.30am - 4pm

Venue: University of Reading, Whiteknights Campus, Building 1 room G74 (RG6 6UR)

The aims of this course are:

  • To provide an understanding of sexual physiology
  • To elaborate on the various sexual dysfunctions of women and men
  • To discuss appropriate methods of treatment
  • To have confidence in knowing what questions to ask the client to make a clearer assessment of the difficulty, and whether to make a specialist referral.

Objectives:

By the end of the day, the delegate will be able to:

  • Label the various parts of sexual anatomy
  • Understand the differences between female and male sexual arousal systems
  • List the most common sexual disorders
  • Understand the process of treatment to allay the client's fears
  • Know to whom to refer for specialist treatment
  • Incorporate strategies into your own way of working to help the couple

Programme:

Registration begins from 9.30am, with a prompt start at 10am the programme includes:

  • Female sexual dysfunction and treatments
  • Male sexual dysfunction and treatments
  • Working with the couple
  • Case studies Plenary

Full set of comprehensive hand-outs included. The Day closes at 4pm

Dr Glyn Hudson Allez is a Forensic Psychosexual Therapist and psychologist, specialising in counselling and forensic issues. She has worked as a therapist for nearly 30 years, 8 of which were in Primary Health Care, and more recently specialised in working with sexual offenders using a unique integrative style. She has published numerous papers, theses and book chapters, and three books: Time Limited Therapy in a General Practice Setting (1997, Sage), and Sex & Sexuality: Questions and Answers for Counsellors and Psychotherapists (2005, Whurr) and Infant Losses; Adult Searches. A Neural and Developmental Perspective on Psychopathology and Sexual Offending (2010, Karnac), the latter is now in 2nd edition. Glyn has two fellowships: from the Association of Counsellors & Psychotherapists in Primary Care (CPC), and The College of Sexual and Relationship Therapists (COSRT, formerly BASRT).

Please do bring a packed lunch. Soft drinks will be provided and hot beverages are available from vending machines on site.
We look forward to welcoming you.

EMDR

Presented by Richard Mitchell
Tuesday, 17th May 2011

Synopsis: This evening talk is designed to introduce clinicians to Eye Movement Desensitisation and Reprocessing (EMDR). EMDR is a comprehensive, integrative psychotherapy approach that contains elements of many effective psychotherapies including psychodynamic, cognitive behavioural, interpersonal, experiential, and body-centred therapies.

The presenter will explain how EMDR psychotherapy is an information processing therapy that uses an eight phase approach to address the experiential contributors of a wide range of disorders. During EMDR the client attends to past experiences that have set the groundwork for present disturbance, current situations that trigger dysfunctional emotions, beliefs and sensations, and positive experiences that are needed to enhance future adaptive behaviours and mental health.

The presenter will describe how during treatment various procedures and protocols are used to address the entire clinical picture. One of the procedural elements is "dual stimulation" using bilateral eye movements, tones or taps. Dual stimulation involves the client attending momentarily to past memories, present triggers, or anticipated future experiences while simultaneously focusing on a set of external stimulus. Clients generally experience the spontaneous emergence of insight, changes in memories, or new associations together with a significant decrease in levels of distress.

Biography: Richard Mitchell is an EMDR Europe Senior Trainer, consultant and psychotherapist. He is the founding president of the EMDR Europe Association and has contributed significantly to the development and implementation of the highest standards in the theory and practice of EMDR throughout Europe. The EMDR Europe Association is now the largest and most influential trauma related organisation in Europe with over 7000 members. Richard was trained by the founder of EMDR Francine Shapiro.

Richard is chair of the EMDR Europe Standards Committee and is responsible for the monitoring and accreditation of EMDR Europe trainers and training courses. He is also a trustee of the UK & Ireland professional association. He runs EMDR training courses throughout the UK and has also trained internationally as part to the EMDR Humanitarian assistance programme following national disasters, war and civil conflict. Richard is a director of EMDR Works, a leading UK training organisation.

He is a UKCP accredited psychotherapist with a background is in Mental Health Social work and psychodynamic and humanistic psychotherapy. He is Clinical Director of the Trauma Centre in London where he and his team treat a wide range of trauma related conditions.

AGM

Hosted by Chair: Debbie Livingston
Tuesday 5th April 2011 at The Best Western Moat House

NOTICE: is hereby given that the Annual General Meeting of Reading Therapies Group ('RTG') will take place on Tuesday 5 April 2011 at 7.30pm at The Best Western Moat House, Mill Lane, Sindlesham, Wokingham, Berkshire RG41 5DF (for directions please refer to www.bw-readingmoathouse.co.uk)).

RTG would like to invite members who might be interested in finding out what we do and how we do it. Plus, if you are interested in joining the Committee, please do come along and speak to one of our members, who will be happy to help and give you the necessary information. The current Management Committee includes:

  • Debbie Livingston (Chair)
  • Katrina Likhtman (Deputy)
  • Anita Spark (Treasurer)
  • Finola Berger (Secretary)
  • Joy Abel
  • Suzanne Gerstner
  • Jack Creagh
  • Barry Stebbings

Shame Baby

Presented by Ellie Roberts
Tuesday, 15th March 2011

Synopsis: This paper explores through work in the Consulting Room the internal racist world of a five year old boy as he comes to terms with his mixed race ethnicity. The work with this young boy was an intensive piece of work lasting two and half years and the paper pays particular attention to the process of child psychotherapy in the play room.

Biography: Ellie Roberts is a Consultant Child & Adolescent Psychotherapist and Lead Psychotherapist for Oxon and Bucks CAMHS. She works at the Tavistock Clinic and in private practice in Oxford. She teaches Psychoanalytic Infant Observational Studies in Oxford and Bologna.

Sexual Addiction - Myth or Reality?

Presented by Dr Thaddeus Birchard
Tuesday, 15th February 2011

Synopsis: Since the advent of the Internet we are seeing more and more people presenting with preoccupative Internet use that borders on the obsessive.

This presentation will consider how these and other 'out of control' sexual behaviours are to be regarded and classified: sexual addiction, compulsivity, impulse control disorder, hypersexuality or paraphilia-related disorders. The behaviours will be defined and decribed, the start-up of the behaviour will be illustrated in the family of origin, and the role of shame and self-contempt will be outlined. Additionally there will be time given to examining treatment options both individually and in group processes.

The goal of the presentation will be to give an insight into the problem and to provide therapists with sufficent knowledge to help with 'diagnosis' and treatment. The outline of this presentation includes:

  • Sexual Addiction
  • This Dreadful Scourge [Krafft-Ebing]
  • Criteria for Sexual Addiction
  • Sexual Addiction and Affect States
  • Narcissistic Damage
  • Psychoanalytic Theory
  • Paraphilias
  • Sexual Addiction and Paraphilias
  • Nomenclature [What do we call this?]
  • Case Study
  • Impact on the Couple Relationship
  • Treatment

Biography: Dr Thaddeus Birchard trained at the Whittington Hospital and has a Pg Diploma in Cognitive Behavioural Therapy from London Metropolitan University and an MSc in Psychosexual Therapy from the School of Health and Social Care, London South Bank University. He also has a Doctorate in Psychotherapy from Middlesex University and the Metanoia Institute. He is accredited for practice with the British Association for Sexual and Relationship Therapy and is registered with the United Kingdom Council for Psychotherapy. He is Chairman of the Association for the Treatment of Sexual Addiction and Compulsivity.

Future of psychotherapy in the Internet Age. A Transpersonal perspective

Presented by Keith Silvester
Tuesday, 18th January 2011

Synopsis: We now live in an age of instant communication where contact between people may well be wider than in past generations, but more superficial and transient. With the advent of search engines such as Google and social networking sites such as Facebook we have become accustomed to substituting 'information' for 'wisdom' and valuing the personally explicit and immediate rather than what is mysterious and unfolding in human relationships - what the sociologist Zygmunt Bauman refers to as "the frailty of human bonds". This massive social change has had an impact on the type of client issues brought into the consulting room, reflecting wider systemic issues and anxieties that did not exist even twenty years ago. Many therapists, although not necessarily technophobic, have not grasped the effect of the digital age on the psyche, and often not adapted their theories and perspectives, on the pretext that this is just a generational gap. Others retreat to the 'timeless archetype' as a means of sidestepping the effects and complexities of social change. In this talk and discussion I will look at the some of the ways we might widen our perspectives, yet retain a sense of the timeless, the deep and the numinous in our work."

Biography: Keith Silvester is a psychosynthesis psychotherapist, trainer and supervisor, originally trained in community work. From 2003 to 2010 he was Director of Programmes of the Psychosynthesis & Education Trust in London, where he continues to work on a freelance basis. Prior to that he was Head of the Student Counselling and Advisory at the Central School of Speech and Drama. Currently he is training to become a practitioner of the Alexander Technique, and has had a lifelong interest in modernism and architecture.

Reflections on the Ethics of Supervision

Presented by Chris Mackenna
Tuesday, 7th December 2010

Synopsis: Any number of ethical issues can arise in supervision, and we will consider some of them in this seminar. I will begin, though, by suggesting that the prime ethical purpose of supervision is to safeguard the spirit of the work. There will be time for discussion, and participants are invited to bring supervisory experiences that have raised ethical issues for them. The main aim of the seminar will not be to suggest 'right answers' but, rather, to identify the qualities needed to inform our ethical thinking.

Biography: Chris Mackenna is an Anglican priest and a Senior Member of the Jungian Analytic Section of the British Association of Psychotherapists. He is currently Director of St Marylebone Healing and Counselling Centre, London, and Chaplain and Clinical Director of the Guild of Health.

Learning from Impasses, Enactments and Breakdowns in the Working Alliance

An attempt to find a language across the modalities for these crucial experiences

Presented by Michael Soth
Tuesday, 12th October 2010

Synopsis: This evening talk addresses a crucial experience in the therapeutic relationship: difficulties in the working alliance. What are our options for dealing creatively with them ? And what can we learn from other therapeutic approaches outside our own modality and habitual style that might increase our chances of not only surviving impasses, but maximising their therapeutic potential ?

There was a tendency, traditionally, to consider any breaks in the working alliance as a 'mistake' on the part for the practitioner, a sign of incompetence or the therapist's 'own stuff'. Over the last 20 years, a focus on the therapeutic relationship has increasingly emerged across almost all approaches, and 'Learning from the Patient' (Casement) has become a generally accepted and acceptable notion. The recent paradigm shift towards relationality proposes that breaks and disturbances in the working alliance are essential to the process of therapy and how we respond to them is central to whether and how therapy works, whatever our approach.

Tonight Michael will offer an embodied and relational perspective on impasses and disturbances in the working alliance - a perspective which relies on our capacity to stay close to the bodymind detail of our experience - the client's and the therapist's, including especially non-verbal and right-brain-to-right-brain communications. Becoming aware of and working with these subtle spontaneous processes - usually considered subliminal - is essential in order to access the transformative potential of enactments and breakdowns in the working alliance.

Biography: Michael Soth is Training Director at the Chiron Centre for Body Psychotherapy. Michael Soth is an Integral-Relational Body Psychotherapist, trainer and supervisor (UKCP), practising in Oxford, with more than 20 years' experience of practising and teaching from an integrative perspective. Drawing on concepts, values and ways of working from a wide range of psychotherapeutic approaches across both psychoanalytic and humanistic traditions, he is interested in the therapeutic relationship as a bodymind process between two people who are both wounded and whole.

He has written numerous articles and is a frequent presenter at conferences. Extracts from his published writing (including several book chapters) as well as summaries of presentations are available at www.soth.co.uk. He is currently preparing a training for group leaders and facilitators and is also organising a new project, offering CPD training for therapeutic and helping professionals.

Sexuality and the Analytic Couple

Presented by Viqui Rosenberg
Tuesday, 12th October 2010

Synopsis: Sexuality lies at the crossroads between body, fantasy and emotion. As Freud understood so well, our entire lives are dedicated to mastering its vicissitudes: expressing it, deriving pleasure from it, harnessing it, repressing it. This endeavour shapes the individual psyche when - of necessity - we renounce, transform and sublimate our sexual impulses. Within the parental couple as well as between each parent and infant, sexuality strongly contributes to the matrix of the child's identity. Later on, the very role of the analyst - as it inevitably evokes the parental function - elicits and revives these powerful dynamics. In this way the analyst as a sexual object is overdetermined, coming into focus with all the weight of the transference-countertransference dimension. During analysis, the gradual lifting of well-established repression adds to the force with which sexual feelings emerge in the consulting room: sexuality is on the ascendant and in search of a suitable object. Interpreting the erotic transference, however, does not always follow - the analyst fears confusing infantile longing with sexual desire and staging a scene of seduction. Unchecked, this anxiety might result in a temporary loss of the analytic stance. The paper suggests that the capacity to recognize and accept the significance of the vicissitudes of sexuality as it evolves and transforms in the analytic relationship offers a direct line to primitive, intimate and unconscious levels of psychic functioning, and significantly deepens the analytic work.

Biography: Viqui Rosenberg is a training psychoanalyst and supervisor with the British Psychoanalytic Association and with the British Association of Psychotherapists. She teaches psychoanalytic theory and has a private practice, and also works as a Consultant Psychotherapist in the NHS.

Viqui Rosenberg has given lectures and workshops in a variety of subjects, and has three published papers on transference-countertransference: 'On touching a patient', 'Erotic transference and its vicissitudes in the countertransference' and 'Countertransference: whose feelings?

An Introduction to using CAT with Eating Disorders

Presented by Harriet Gamble
Tuesday, 15th June 2010

Synopsis: Using a case example Harriet Gamble will introduce Cognitive Analytic Therapy when working with eating disorders.

Biography: Harriet Gamble has over 30 years' experience working with general mental health problems in the NHS and the private sector helping people deal with a wide range of emotional, psychological and life problems. She worked for many years as a senior clinician at Guys Hospital, The Maudsley and the Bethlem Royal Hospital. For the last 12 years Harriet has specialised in the treatment of eating difficulties at Berkshire Health Care Trust as well as private health care providers. Harriet Gamble is a clinical psychotherapist, practitioner supervisor specialising in Cognitive Analytic Therapy (CAT).

Learning from Life

Presented by Patrick Casement
Tuesday, 12th June 2010

Synopsis: Experiences that have especially contributed to his understanding of psychoanalytic theory and clinical practice will be described. Patrick will also look at ways in which our own experience can help or hinder us in our work.

Biography: Patrick Casement obtained his degree at Cambridge University, in Anthropology and Theology. He then trained to become a social worker, subsequently training as an analytical psychotherapist and then as a psychoanalyst. Until he retired he was a training and supervising analyst of the British Psychoanalytical Society. His first book 'On Learning from the Patient', published in 1985, became an international bestseller in the field of psychoanalysis, now in over 20 languages. A later book, 'Learning from Our Mistakes', published in 2002, was awarded a Gradiva Award in America for its contribution to psychoanalysis. His last book 'Learning from Life: becoming a psychoanalyst'(2006) is partly autobiographical - an unusual step for an analyst but one he feels able to take now that he has retired.

The Birth of Intersubjectivity

Presented by Gottfried Heuer
Tuesday, 18th May 2010

Synopsis: "I have only mixed with anarchists and declare myself to be an anarchist," Otto Gross told psychiatrists (Berze/Stelzer 1999/2000) who examined him in 1913. He continued, "I am a psychoanalyst and from my experience I have gained the insight that the existing order . . . is a bad one. . . . [A]nd since I want everything changed, I am an anarchist (p. 24)". In the same year, Gross (1913a) wrote, "The psychology of the unconscious is the philosophy of the revolution (col. 385)." So, when Coline Covington (2001), in her recent paper "The future of analysis", writes, "Analysis is essentially a tool for revolution (p.331)", she is echoing something that Gross said nearly 90 years previously. He was not just a psycho-analyst - he was a psycho-anarchist. The psychiatrists in 1913 promptly noted Gross' political views as one the symptoms of mental disorder.

Although the Austrian psychoanalyst and anarchist Otto Gross (1877 - 1920) played a pivotal role in the birth of what today we are calling modernity, with wide-ranging influences in psychiatry, analysis, politics, sociology, literature, and ethics, he has remained virtually unknown to this day. To a large extent, this is the result of an analytic historiography that Erich Fromm (1958) has somewhat provocatively called "Stalinistic (p.195)": dissidents become non-persons and vanish from the records. Today, when we think of the origins of analysis, immediately the names of Jung and Freud spring to mind. But there was someone else who stood between these two, in direct contact with both - who, in a way, has been hidden in their shadow. - And, as we know from Jung (in Tuby 1984), "the shadow can contain up to eighty percent pure gold (p. 13)", its essence is "pure gold". Otto Gross’ first biographer (Hurwitz 1979) called him a "Seeker of Paradise". In this search he was radical and without compromise. He was a revolutionary and hence a dissident. In the historiography of psychoanalysis that was sufficient for making him a non-person.

So who was this "Seeker of Paradise between Freud and Jung (ibid.)"? And what happened for him to become an unknown?

I have divided my talk into two parts: Otto Gross' Life History, his Contributions to Psychoanalytic Theory and Clinical Practice.

Biography: Dr Gottfried Heuer is a Jungian Training Analyst and Supervisor with the Association of Jungian Analysts, and a Biodynamic Body-psychotherapist and Trainer, in private practice in West London. With 35 years of experience in clinical practice, he has published widely on the links between analysis, radical politics, body-psychotherapy and spirituality and on the history of analysis in English, German, Finnish, French, Portuguese and Serbo-Croat. He has contributed papers to The Journal of Analytical Psychology, The International Journal of Psychoanalysis, Harvest, International Journal of Jungian Studies, Spring, et al., and for the International Otto Gross Society (www.ottogross.org), which he co-founded and chairs, he (co-)edited 6 vols. of Congress Proceedings (www.literaturwissenschaft.de). He is also the editor of the forthcoming, "Sacral Revolutions: Reflecting on the Work of Andrew Samuels - Cutting Edges in Psychoanalysis and Jungian Analysis" (Routledge 2009).

Annual General Meeting

Tuesday, 27th April
Refreshments from 7.30pm with the AGM starting promptly at 8pm.

The AGM is open to all RTG members and we look forward to welcoming you on the night.

Paedophilia

Presented by Rob Hale
Tuesday, 9th March 2010

Synopsis: There are few subjects which arouse stronger feelings than paedophilia. In this presentation I hope to explore, through countertransference and transference phenomena, as well as the nature of the act itself and the history leading up to it, an understanding of the mind of the paedophile. Such an understanding must be the basis of any treatment; the paradox is that it is the treatment itself which yields the crucial information on which the theory is based. Clinical material will therefore be a central part of this presentation.

Biography: Rob Hale FRCPsych. M.Inst Psychoanal. I have worked at the Portman Clinic (and Tavistock Clinic) since 1980. My interest has always been in the mechanisms which propel an individual to act out perverse or violent phantasies. My clinical interest has thus been in the areas of paedophilia, violence and suicide. More recently I have been concerned with the effect of the psychopathic mind on the institution which contains them and on the mental health of those charged with their care.

Imago Relationship Therapy

Presented by Bryan Greene
Tuesday, 9th February, 2010

Synopsis: Imago Relationship Therapy was developed by Harville Hendrix, Ph.D., author of "Getting the Love You Want: A Guide for Couples" which has been on the New York Times Best Seller list for over 20 years. It empowers couples to:

  • Communicate in ways that help each partner to feel heard and that lead to mutual respect, understanding, empathy and deeper connection.
  • Make sense of their conflicts and underlying dynamics.
  • Meet their challenges and grow beyond old reactive patterns of behaviour learnt from childhood relationship experiences.
  • Heal the wounds/hurts that are sensitive reminders of childhood pain.
  • Experience a new safety and greater intimacy, vitality and passion.

Imago Relationship Therapy provides therapists with a theoretical roadmap to help them understand the deep issues behind the seeming chaos and guide their clients on a journey of healing and growth. It provides therapists and clients with specific, useable skills that help achieve this. In this one hour presentation the following will be included and there will be time afterwards for questions and the exchange of ideas:

  • Childhood relationships.
  • The Imago
  • Adulthood relationships
  • The Unconscious Relationship
  • The Conscious Relationship
  • Demonstration of Imago Intentional Dialogue
  • Training as an Imago Therapist

Bibliography: Toward the end of a long career in business and Human Resources and as part of my personal and professional development, Byran Greene undertook an eight year transpersonal training in Counselling, Psychotherapy and Supervision at the Centre for Counselling and Psychotherapy Education in Maida Vale, London and began his own practice there in 1993. Bryan initially worked with individuals and then having married and started a family became increasingly interested in relationships and the dynamics between people. Inspired by the work of Harville Hendrix he trained as an Imago Relationship Therapist which left him so impressed that he wanted to make the benefits of Imago more readily available in UK. Bryan subsequently became the founding Chairperson of Imago UK and have since been actively involved in promoting Imago. Bryan Greene currently lives in Bristol with his wife and 3 young boys and has a practice seeing both individuals and couples.

Imago is still relatively unknown in the UK where there are currently only 11 certified Imago Therapists.

The Symbolism and Significance of the Fee - presented by Joan Bristow

Tuesday 8 December 2009
Everyone is welcome to join us for Mulled wine and mince pies at 7.30pm. Talk starts promptly at 8.00pm.

Cost:  Free for RTG members, £8 for non-members.
 
Title:  Money: The Symbolism and Significance of the Fee: Presented by Joan Bristow

Synopsis:  The use of the fee and how money is used symbolically within the counselling profession has been of interest to this evening’s Speaker for a long time.  Nearly one hundred years ago, Freud noted that our approach to matters of money was with inconsistency, prudishness and hypocrisy (1913).  Does this statement still stand today?  The evening will explore our own issues around money and how this can, more often than not, unconsciously be played out in the therapeutic work that we undertake.

Biography:  Joan Bristow began her counselling training over 15 years ago at Wokingham and District Counselling Service (now known as Berkshire Counselling Centre) and initially worked as a volunteer counsellor.  She then went on to complete the Advanced (Graduate) Diploma at Wpf in London. She now works in private practice and is a Senior Accredited Counsellor with BACP, UKCP and BAPPS.  She is also a qualified Supervisor and works in local Wpf network centres, supervising groups of counsellors and individual counsellors within her practice.  She has a keen interest in training and has been involved locally in teaching on Certificate and Diploma Courses, and has lead many clinical seminars, study days and workshops.

CBT for Anxiety: Panacea or Plaster? - presented by Roz Shafran

Tuesday 10 November 2009
Drinks and nibbles at 7.30pm.
Talk starts promptly at 8.00pm.

Cost: Free for RTG members, £8 for non-members.

Synopsis: The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence recommend specific forms of cognitive behaviour therapy for the full range of anxiety disorders. The talk will describe these different forms of cognitive behaviour therapy and the competences that clinicians need to acquire in order to implement them effectively. These interventions are effective in reducing symptoms for the majority of clients with anxiety disorders but questions remain as to which clients are likely to respond and what happens to clients who do not respond. It is concluded that cognitive behaviour therapy for anxiety disorders is neither a panacea nor a plaster, but a range of interventions that must be used skilfully to help our clients improve their symptoms and quality of life.

Bibliography: Roz Shafran graduated from Oxford University with First Class Honours in 1991. She subsequently spent time at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, studying OCD under the supervision of Professor S. Rachman, who was a pioneer of behavioural theories and treatments for OCD. She returned to the UK in 1992 and began her doctoral research examining different theories of OCD, returning to Vancouver for a further 2 years of post-doctoral study with Professor Rachman from 1995-1997. She obtained her clinical qualification in 1999 and began work as a Wellcome Trust Fellow at the University of Oxford studying cognitive behavioural theories and treatment of eating disorders. In 2007 she became the Charlie Waller Chair of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy at the University of Reading. She is the Strategic Director for IAPT in Reading. She has published over 30 research papers in the topics of anxiety, perfectionism and eating disorders and has given talks on her research at national and international conferences. She is currently the co-Chair of the Scientific Committee of the British Association of Cognitive and Behavioural Psychotherapies and an associate editor of the leading journal in the field, Behaviour Research and Therapy. She is married with 3 children.

The Psychodynamic Understanding of Obesity part two - presented by Anne Reilly

Tuesday 13 October 2009
Drinks and nibbles at 7.30pm.
Talk starts promptly at 8.00pm
Cost: Free for RTG members, £8 for non-members.

Synopsis: Obesity presents the biggest health challenge the nation faces. Currently one in every four adults is obese. If this trend continues, then by 2050, nine out of every ten adults will be overweight or obese. By then, the cost to the NHS will be £4.2 billion. This presentation will not only consider the psychological aspects of obesity alongside cultural trends and biological forces, but also the challenge faced by clinicians within the therapeutic encounter with an obese patient.

Bibliography: Anne Reilly (B.Ed, MA, M.Clin.Sci., MA (Tavistock)) is a Consultant Psychotherapist working at Winterbourne House Psychotherapy Service in Reading. She is a UKCP registered psychoanalytic psychotherapist and a group analyst.

PAUL MARGRIE

A presentation and exploration of dreams from a Transpersonal perspective.
Presented by Lou Corner

The presentation:
I am 53 years old and have been working as a psychotherapist for 20 years. My engagement with this work began when I was living in Eire where I owned an organic smallholding and ran a landscape gardening business. I got involved in Co Counselling and found that I truly loved working with people. For about 4 years I ran men's groups in Eire and was becoming more and more involved in therapeutic work. In 1992 I decided it was time to get serious and train properly to be a psychotherapist. I returned to the U.K. after nearly 20 years away and spent the next 5 years training at CCPE (The Centre for Counselling and Psychotherapy Education). I qualified in 1997 and have since completed a supervisor training programme and an Advanced Diploma in Transpersonal Psychotherapy.
Currently I run a busy private practice; supervise individuals and groups; teach and facilitate at CCPE; and am a member of the Management Committee at CCPE. I was until recently the CCPE representative to the UKCP and the BACP. In this seminar I intend to introduce a way of working with dreams that offers a re-experiencing of the dream for the client so that the various facets and episodes of the dream can be explored and elucidated.
I will talk about how our dream life is one of several ways that we may experience the Creative Imagination; a realm that bridges the human and the divine domains. I will also discuss the relationship between our dreams and the awakening of our Soul's nature.
If there is time I would like to give a brief demonstration of working with a dream in this way, so be prepared to share a dream with us on the day!

Issues for Assessment and Referral
19th May 2009

Presented by Lou Corner

The presentation:
It is hoped that there will be a lot of time for discussion and that those present will bring their own experience of assessment, either undertaking it or taking on patients/clients having first received an assessment report. Whilst the focus will be on psychoanalytic/psychodynamic work, it is hoped that those from other orientations will feel able to contribute, helping us observe both similarities and differences. In addition to talking about the process of the assessment
session itself, the presentation will ask questions such as:

Why do we need to do assessments? Are they useful?

What do we need to have in our minds before we conduct an assessment?

If assessing for ourselves, what do we do if we consider the potential patients/client might not be helped by psychotherapy/counselling?

Whilst the focus will be of work in private practice or voluntary settings, some reference will be made to working
in the NHS and the differences that arise for the practitioner.

Biographical details:

Lou Corner is a psychoanalyst, currently work in private practice in Reading.
She is currently Chair of the Professional Conduct Panel of the British Psychoanalytic Council, having previously been the BPC's Chair. Lou has worked in a variety of settings, including the NHS and the voluntary sector, where she had to undertake assessments and she currently carries out assessments for a number of professional psychotherapy organisations. This includes assessing people for suitability to become training patients for trainees undertaking psychotherapy training.

Green Care for the NHS
21st April 2009

Green Care for the NHS
The micro-management of mental health services is not conducive to creating an environment and culture within which service users can find foundation blocks for recovery and lasting improvement. 'Green Care' is a movement which will provide opportunities for health and well being to be addressed in more fundamental ways. This talk will explain some of the background, illustrate ways in which it can fit into the national agenda for improvements in public mental health, and discuss local possibilities.

Rex Haigh is a consultant psychiatrist, clinical advisor to the Department of Health's National Personality Disorder Development Programme, and training lead for the new National Personality Disorder Institute at Nottingham University. He is founder and project lead of the 'Community of Communities' quality network at the Royal College of Psychiatrists and is involved with several third sector organisations. He has written and published numerous articles about therapeutic communities and personality disorder, and is co-editor of both the Jessica Kingsley "“Community, Culture and Change"” book series and the International Journal of Therapeutic Communities. Currently, he is also working with an EU research think-tank on 'Green Care'.

'Mothertongue counselling service : journeys across cultural borderlands'
10th March 2009

Beverley Costa is the director of Mothertongue multi- ethnic counselling and listening service, a charity based in Reading since 2000. Since its inception, it became the first counselling service in Reading to be accredited by the BACP; it has won the National Charities Award and the regional NHS Health and Social Care Award. This year it was chosen as the recipient of the BACP Award for Excellence. Beverley is a UKCP registered psychotherapist and psychodramtaist and has over 20 years' experience of training and facilitating groups.

The session will introduce the Mothertongue Counselling service and the community development model on which it is based . We will then explore cross cultural communication in more than one language and will consider a model of acculturation and collective/individual world views.

The session will draw on case material, role play material and excerpts from DVDs. There will be time allocated to discuss and reflect upon how some of the ideas presented can be incorporated into participants' practice.

Date of next meeting
Tuesday 10 February 2009

Drinks and nibbles at 7.30pm
Talk starts promptly at 8.00pm

Cost: Free for RTG members,
£8 for non-members.

Title: The Psychodynamics of Eating Disorders presented by Anne Reilly

Synopsis: It is said that Anna Freud once described 'Eating Disorders as the step child of mental health' referring to the fact that no clinician really wanted to look after them.
This talk aims to outline the psychoanalytic understanding of eating disorders from an object-relations perspective and discuss some of the ideas that have been put forward by clinicians in dealing with this client group. The different classifications of eating disorders will be described alongside some case material.
There will be time for discussion.

Bibliography: Anne Reilly (B.Ed, MA, M.Clin.Sci., MA (Tavistock) is a Consultant Psychotherapist working at Winterbourne House psychotherapy service in Reading. She is a UKCP registered psychoanalytic psychotherapist and a trainee group analyst.

Date of next meeting
13th January

Drinks and nibbles from 7.30pm
Talk starts promptly at 8.00pm
Cost: Free for RTG members
£8 for non-members

Title: Narcissism and Addictions
Speaker: Phil Joslin
Synopsis and Bibliography to follow shortly

Date of next meeting
9th December

Join us for mince pies and mulled wine

Drinks and nibbles at 7.30pm.
Talk starts promptly at 8.00pm

Cost: Free for RTG members, £8 for non-members.

Title: Sickness or sin, therapist or Priest? A search for Healing

Speaker: Felicity Madden

Synopsis: During the evening, Felicity will present a Case Study which explores the interface between psychotherapy and religious pastoral care.

Bibliography: Felicity Madden is a psychoanalytical psychotherapist in private practice. She supervises individuals and groups and is part of the team offering the Master's Programme in Psychodynamic Counselling and Psychotherapy at Oxford University.

Tuesday 11 November 2008

Drinks and nibbles at 7.30pm. Talk starts promptly at 8.00pm.

Cost: Free for RTG members, £7 for non-members.

Title: An Introduction to Music Therapy - presented by Karen Hutchinson

Synopsis: During the evening, Karen will give a broad overview of what Music Therapy is, and how she uses music to help children and adults to interact and express themselves when they may find it hard, or impossible, to do so with words. She will give some case-study examples, and there will be time for exploring and playing instruments too.

Biographical Details: Following a psychology degree, Karen did a Post-Graduate Diploma in Music Therapy, qualifying from the Roehampton Institute in 1996, and has worked as a Music Therapist ever since. She has worked with children and adults, from nursery age to elderly clients, and with a wide range of disabilities and needs. Her main instruments are the piano and clarinet, but she also began to learn the trumpet and to try to play chords on the guitar. She currently works at a school in Woodley which is the first special school in the country to be granted specialist music status.

Tuesday 17 June 2008

Drinks and nibbles at 7.30pm. Talk starts promptly at 8.00pm.

Cost: Free for RTG members, £7 for non-members.

Title: 'Countertransference as the Essential Therapeutic Factor in Analysis: a Post-Jungian Perspective' - presented by Jill Fowler

Synopsis: Unlike Freud, Jung left us with few examples of how he actually worked. However, he does seem to have been the first analyst to have recognised the therapeutic and anti-therapeutic potential in countertransference. Jill's talk will provide us with a brief overview of Jung's propositions about countertransference and describe the diverse development amongst post-Jungians in the understanding of the phenomenon.

Biographical Details: Jill Fowler is a UKCP registered Jungian Analytical Psychotherapist. She originally trained as a psychodynamic counsellor at the University of Reading, where she also taught for some years on the Postgraduate Diploma/MA in Counselling. She has a long-established private practice and is also currently working part-time as a psychotherapist in the NHS, based at Winterbourne House in Reading.

Tuesday 13 May 2008

Drinks and nibbles at 7.30pm. Talk starts promptly at 8.00pm.

Cost: Free for RTG members, £7 for non-members.

Title: 'Trust - What is it like to live all your life without trust?' - presented by Sydney Klugman

Synopsis: Reading Therapies Group is delighted to welcome Sydney Klugman, who has agreed, at very short notice, to replace our advertised speaker for the May 2008 meeting. His talk will focus on the importance of trust in the therapeutic relationship, through a description of joint work between art and drama therapy. It will explore the process of art therapy in a high secure unit, working with a group of patients with mixed diagnoses.

Biographical Details: Sydney Klugman is an HPC Registered Art Psychotherapist working in a medium secure unit at Blenheim Priory. He has lectured ang. His talk will focus on the importance of trust in the therapeutic relationship, through a description of joint work between art and drama therapy. It will explore the process of art therapy in a high secure unit, working with a group of patients with mixed diagnoses.

Biographical Details: Sydney Klugman is an HPC Registered Art Psychotherapist working in a medium secure unit at Blenheim Priory. He has lectured at Brunel University, teaching Art Therapy to Occupational Therapists and Counsellors and has also worked at Broadmoor as a Forensic Psychotherapist. Sydney also works in private practice, is an experienced accredited supervisor and an artist.

Tuesday 15 April 2008

Drinks and nibbles at 7.30pm. Talk starts promptly at 8.00pm.

Cost: Free for RTG members, £7 for non-members.

Title: The Applied Client - Those Groups Considered 'Beyond the Pale' for the Provision of Psychological Treatments - presented by Valerie Sinason

Synopsis: What does it mean when a client group is seen as requiring 'applied' analysis or therapy, as if the main core of clinical and theoretical understanding somehow does not apply to them? When Freud considered that people over 40, those with learning disabilities and the psychotic might not be able to use psychoanalysis, he had the humbleness to consider than in future this might alter. However, it seems the human need to put some groups 'beyond the pale' continues, even in the provision of psychological treatments.

Valerie Sinason considers this topic with examples from work with clients with a learning disability/ritual abuse background/dissociative identity disorder.

Biographical Details: Valerie Sinason is an Adult Psychoanalyst and Child Psychotherapist, currently Director of the Clinic for Dissociative Studies and she is an Honorary Consultant Psychotherapist to the Cape Town Child Guidance Clinic, University of Cape Town Psychology Department and External Consultant Supervisor to Respond. She specialises in disability, trauma and abuse and is regularly used as an expert in court cases.

She has written extensively on psychotherapy, disability and abuse, with over 70 published peer-reviewed papers, chapters and books. She is also a widely published and anthologised poet, with two full-length collections. She was a Consultant Child Psychotherapist at the Tavistock Clinic, where she worked from 1987 to 1999, a Consultant Psychotherapist at both the Anna Freud and Portman Clinics from 1994-1997, and Consultant Research Psychotherapist/Psychoanalyst at St George's Hospital Medical School, University of London, Psychiatry of Disability Department from 1990-2006, and President of the Institute of Psychotherapy and Disability.

Tuesday 11 March 2008

Drinks and nibbles at 7.30pm. Talk starts promptly at 8.00pm.

Cost: Free for RTG members, £7 for non-members.

Title: Creative Tools - presented by Chris Ledger

Synopsis: Chris has led weekend courses on the use of creative tools in counselling. This is a method that she believes can be a valuable tool in both long- and short-term counselling. She will be joined for the evening by three counsellors who will each share a particular creative tool that they have found to produce a positive outcome in their work. Part of the evening will be experiential and will involve the use of pictures, sand, 'givens', soft toys and Russian dolls.

Biographical Details: Chris has worked for 18 years as a counsellor, supervisor and trainer in NHS Primary Care. She was one of many who were made redundant by her PCT, following which she created her own successful counselling business Loddon Counselling and Psychotherapy Services. She works privately as a counsellor and supervisor. She is involved in counselling training days, and, as co-author, has produced three Christian Insight books Anxiety, Anxiety and Self-esteem and Shattered Dreams (on M.E.).

Tuesday 12 February 2008

Drinks and nibbles at 7.30pm. Talk starts promptly at 8.00pm.

Cost: Free for RTG members, £7 for non-members.

Title: Short-term Psychotherapy: Panacea or Problem? - presented by Alex Coren

Biographical Details: Alex Coren is Director of the Psychodynamic Studies Programme and Director of Studies for Psychology in the Department for Continuing Education at the University of Oxford. Having trained as a Social Worker in the London Borough of Hackney, he then worked as a Psychiatric Social Worker at the National Hospital for Nervous Diseases, London, and at the Camberwell Child Guidance Unit and Maudsley Hospitals. He trained as a Psychoanalytic Psychotherapist with the British Association of Psychotherapists and has worked widely in the fields of adult mental health and Education, most recently at King's College London and Oxford University. His particular interests are the application of psychoanalytic ideas to short-term therapeutic work in the public and voluntary sectors, and the contexts and curriculum for professional therapeutic trainings. He is a member of both the UKCP and UPCA. He is Book Review Editor for the European Journal of Psychotherapy and Counselling and a member of the Editorial Board of Psychodynamic Practice. He is a regular contributor and Reviewer for professional journals. He continues to work as a psychotherapist, supervisor and consultant in private practice. RTG meetings are approved for Royal College of Psychiatrists CPD: 1.5 external units per session. Sessions may also be used towards your CPD portfolio for the BACP etc. You can pick up a certificate for proof of attendance at the meeting.

Tuesday 15 January 2008

Drinks and nibbles at 7.30pm. Talk starts promptly at 8.00pm.

Cost: Free for RTG members, £7 for non-members.

Title: Personality Disorders - presented by Amanda Stafford

Biographical Details: Amanda Stafford is a psychoanalytically-trained Psychotherapist. She has been a practicing psychotherapist for the past 25 years. She has worked in Berkshire for 5 years and is currently the Manager of the Psychotherapy Service and the Directory of Complex Needs. Amanda has worked both within the NHS and in private practice. RTG meetings are approved for Royal College of Psychiatrists CPD: 1.5 external units per session. Sessions may also be used towards your CPD portfolio for the BACP etc. You can pick up a certificate for proof of attendance at the meeting.